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A Game Of Thrones by George RR Martin book review
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As warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert spinia on him the office of the Hand.
His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must.
The old gods have no power in the south, Stark's family is split and there is treachery at court.
Worse, a vengeance mad boy has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities beyong the sea.
Heir of the mad Dragon King deposed by Robert, he claims the Iron Throne.
Ever since my entry into the heady and wonderful peaks of fantasy literature following the release of the Fellowship of the Ring movie in 2001, I have been hard pressed to find an author greater than the inimitable J.
But both authors have fallen short of the sheer scope that Tolkien envisioned and, successfully, created.
Since then, I have only come across two authors who have come close to envisioning and successfully carrying out their literary creations to match Tolkien; Steven Erikson and George R.
Some authors try, and fail miserably.
For Martin though, in scope, creativity, and writing ability, A Song of Ice and Fire is everything you want in an epic fantasy tale.
Set in a world very akin to our apologise, book of ra 3 online game idea medieval history, specifically the English War of recommend hunger games prequel book remarkable Roses, A Game of Thrones introduces us to one of the greatest and largest character lists around.
The story is told from eight perspectives.
Each perspective is held within a chapter which, when the characters move away from each other, allows the author to continually leave minor cliff-hangers at the end of each the rating game book />While six of the characters from this first book are from the same family, the perspective is shifted around in preceding books.
Death is commonplace, almost the rating game book the point of horror, but conducted in such a way that it, sadly, reminds us of our own bloody histories.
Martin does not shy away from the death, rape and plunder that would have been norm for the setting and in doing so provides a much more complete story.
Mindless destruction is often the cause for character splits and confrontations, and by the end of the book characters you assumed you would be attached too for some time are left headless, gutless or simply gone.
Throughout the entire series Martin focuses almost primarily upon one continent.
However there is one character, Daenerys Targaryen, interactive game books online has been forced to flee to a separate continent as a young girl.
At first I remember feeling disorientated and a little slighted at seemingly being provided this perspective which seemed nothing short of pointless.
However as I have continued to read, she has become one of my favourite characters.
Dense to the point of labour, but captivating well past my bed time, Martin knows exactly where to draw the line between lots of information and tedious boredom.
Joshua S Hill The novel, A Game of Thrones, begins with an encounter with supernatural beings; this may give a false impression as to what will come.
As the story begins to unfold, the theme moves strongly into the area of political intrigue and this forthcoming war that will happen as a result.
The fantasy element, while always there plays only a minor role in the majority of the rest of the book.
A Game of Thrones in not your usual fare, it is hard-hitting and bad things do happen to the good people.
Two families take centre stage in a battle for the Throne; the Starks and the Lannisters.
The Stark family live in the cold hard North, Winterfell is the seat of their domain.
We are, using chapters headlined with the family names, introduced to the Stark family.
King Robert is married to a Lannister, Queen Cersei.
He is accompanied there by Tyrion Lannister, a dwarf.
Although they do not become friends they end up with a grudging respect for each other.
Then, suddenly one day, the King is killed hunting wild boar and Eddard and the Lannister are drawn into a battle for the throne.
Finally, at the end, the fantasy element once again returns and we are left looking forward to the second instalment.
This is a very good novel, full of twists and turns.
It leaves you wanting more and move on to A Clash of Kings.
It's ambition: to construct the Twelve Caesars of fantasy fiction, with characters so venemous they could eat the Borgais.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 1 9.
Winter can last a lifetime.
And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.
As Warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robe.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 2 9.
From the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding lands of Winterfell, chaos reigns as pretenders to the Iron T.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 3 9.
The Seven Kingdoms are divided by revolt and blood feud as winter approaches like an angry beast.
In the northern wastes a horde of hungry, sav.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 3 9.
Robb Stark may be King in the North, but he must bend to the will of the old tyrant Walder Frey if he is to hold his crown.
And while his youngest.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 4 7.
The war in the Seven Kingdoms has burned itself out, but in its bitter aftermath new conflicts spark to life.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 5 8.
In the east, Daener.
Have you read A Game Of Thrones?
We've found that while readers like to know what we think of a book they find additional reader reviews a massive help in deciding if it is the right book for them.
So if you have a spare moment, please tell us your thoughts by writing a reader's review.
Eric from America This is a great book.
I enjoy the brutal realism of the characters and the world that Martin has built.
McIntosh from USA How are they considering Game of Thrones high fantasy?
It seems like the perfect example for low fantasy to me.
Most of the show revolves around politics and wars, and magic isn't a normal part of everyday life.
Brecken from USA There are no books I love more than the A Song of Ice and Fire.
Honestly, it deserves so much better than a 9.
I almost exclusively read fantasy and these books are as good as lord of the rings, in a different way a very different way.
The best thing is they are all about character.
In fantasy, characterization is often put to the side so that cool battles and fun magic can be explored more.
There are only two characters in the entire series that I know are the bad guys, and the author even has me feeling bad for them at some points.
Every character feels real, and there are moments where I have hated every one of them, and moments where I have loved them.
They all develop over time in ways that you can barely notice until it hits you that, wow, that character isn't evil anymore.
There are a million plot lines, and each one is very real.
No one cheats, no one can "just do the magic thing" to get out of a situation.
Our favorite characters die, and the bad ones get to live.
It is extremely well written, fast paced in some places and slow in others.
The books have a depth that make you want to read the series over and over again so you can find out just what is going on with the characters, and catch all of the hints and symbolism the author puts in there.
I will never look at fantasy the same again, this series has changed my world view.
Mike from Canada The first book was very entertaining and Ned's death was actually shocking.
I sat there thinking about all that could come from this series.
Yeah some of the writing was ham fisted, who am I to judge, but the plot was like one of those Rockwood Gardnes trees with plums, peaches, cherries and apples all on the same tree.
Lots of low hanging fruit to pick from.
Hey we got these giant hybrid wolves, maybe shapeshifters, telepathy, dragons, ghasts, magic, assassins, and lots more.
Yes there are barbarians in the north and its cliche, but that can work.
Political intrigue of england.
And we have somewhat good and bad guys.
Great start aaaaand then the wheels fall off.
Instead of using some of the fruit he just letting fall off the tree to rot.
Instead we are given lists of crap we don't need to care about.
What type of fowl they are eating, the sauce, where the sauce is from, where the fowl is from, who is eating it.
OH yeah this 3rd Bannerman for the house of Mooreevilish is wearing a turquoise tunic fashioned from the twill of far off Neargoodshire where small puppies are strung up and hit like pinatas but makes them less evil than their neighbour who does it with live babies in Babybashinworth, though Babybashingworth is known for their exquisite soup made from infant brains served in a fusia bowl decorated in intricate gold filigree and a soup spoon fashioned from the eyesocket of the dogs in Neargoodshire, painted a vermillion redly.
See what happens when you aren't concise.
You will never see that bannerman again, the meal has no plot meaning, nore does the origin of the tunic if it doesn't have any consequence later on.
Scene one shotgun on mantle, better use that things sometime during your performance or it shouldn't be there.
A good editor would have made this a lot better.
By book 3 I was still waiting on things I knew where not coming.
I gave up in book 4 because I had done 8 books of Jordan and decided to never waste my time on a series that just sits around.
Yes he kills characters, but it becomes trivial when it happens so often.
Yes and this is novel where you are suppose to bond with characters, not feel like some lofty king who rolls over a beggar in your grand caravan.
Little growth that is meaningful because that character will of course die, plot that just seems to go in a circle, prose that aren't good.
Yes 1 star is harsh, but jebus this could have been so much better.
Book one left enough there to make 5 good series and he couldn't make one in the 5000 pages written so far.
Kath from England Takes a while to read and some parts are slow but the storyline is amazing and I highly recommend.
Poppia from China I have to say, I wonder, how you people could even get through the first page.
I had to read it, because everybody was recommending it.
It's all because of the language.
Seriously, how could people even suffer it?!
What the fuck is "Will had known that they will drag him into the quarrel sooner or later, and he wished it would have been later rather than sooner"???
And what the fuck is "slender as a knife"???
And what the fuck is "he studied that deepening twilight in that half-bored, half-distracted way he had"???
I know popular books are supposed to be easy to read, but this?!
Even grade school kids write way much better, and coherent.
Despite really wanting to read it because I want to find out what is going on and what everybody is talking about in this serieI can't read it, I just can't.
I have no idea why this ever got published.
So, i don't recommend you to read it.
It ruins your linguistic skills.
And it ruins your abilities to write and even talk normally.
Corin from United Kingdom This series is very simplistic for fantasy.
The world is empty, no magic systemno real variation between factions or originality.
Characters all behave the same way.
No explanation or balance which amount to childlike world building.
Where are the normal people, they're all Lords or Knights.
The battles are ridiculous, far too many deaths, no tactics and no war machines of any sort.
Really, what are the chances of Gilly not getting raped at Castle black, slim to none.
Sam would've been raped!
Put a woman in maximum security prison and see what happens.
Violent and miserable does not equal realistic!
TV series is brilliant but not a fair representation of the books.
Donald from US The first three books I would give a "7".
Books 4 and 5 get a 2.
The first three books were page turners, though still flawed.
As others have said, his realism sheds over into sadism at times.
And then there is the overuse of phony cliffhangers-- for www games book com, we are told Arya is hit on the head by an ax swung by a man on horseback and many pages later we find it was only the flat of the ax and so she survived.
Highly unlikely, but aside from that, cheap storytelling.
The TV series has some of the same flaws, but improves on the books by removing some of these idiotic cliffhangers.
And the characters are frankly more human.
Shae, for instance, is a cliched " bad" prostitute in the books.
She is a real human being in the show.
Despite their flaws, the first three books were real page turners for me.
Books 4 and 5 were mostly dreary.
Many of the most interesting characters, good and bad and yes, the distinction is clear have been killed off, only to be replaced by new characters who are simply not that engaging.
Seasons 5 and 6 on TV have been justly criticized, but there are at least some truly exciting episodes and some moderately entertaining dialogue even in the slower episodes.
I have rewatched them all.
I have zero interest in ever rereading Martin's books, because the last two have been so bad.
I don't really care if he ever finishes the series.
For me, the TV series, flawed as it is, is the real story as far as I am concerned.
Martin created an immensely fascinating world, but he badly needed an editor who could stand up to him.
Gabriele from Italy Overated books.
Childish and false "European middle age" from low quality school books.
A Must NOT Read.
Worst is the fans, they say that Lord of the Rings is for kids, REALLY?!
This book wad've been good if it divint' have the sex!!!
Lawrence von Kyleman from Prussia HBO show is far superior to the books simply because it seems as though Martin always intended for his series to be made into a visual form.
How else do you explain the long drawn out descriptions of small inconsequential bull which is so frequently used.
I can't imagine how the narrators for the audio-books could keep themselves from falling asleep.
I bet editing and adapting this drivel for TV must be a pain though.
I imagine the writers pouring over the books cutting out the descriptions of stupid crud, useless subplots, and fixing this fat dbags overall bland and plot-hole ridden narrative.
I'd geuss they use about 40% of the source material in the show after that.
I think HBO did an amazing job with this show, and I wish they came up with it themselves so they didn't have to pay some lazy, fat, old man to go through his thousands of pages worth of vapid, drawn-out, poorly executed, novels laden with what I can only assume are his sexual fantasies.
Sundar from Lal This book, and the other books published of the series, are as impressive and amazing piece of literature.
The characters in the story are superb.
I read these book and absolutely had to recommend them to every book buddy.
Decimus from Canada Some people believe that it is justifiable write reviews for the entire series on the page for the first book.
I personally find it interesting, as though many people decided that they would attempt to warn others of the series inevitable decline in the reviews of the first book.
I would have to agree with this line of thinking sadly enough as, like many others I find that the series is excellent at first with many strong points to be found in the first few books, however the strength of the plot wanes once the fourth book starts, and the quality of the books becomes more diluted once the fifth is reached.
The series can still be saved, but with no release date as of yet for the sixth book, with the seventh and final volume most likely being another five to six years after.
The more dedicated fans will be forced to wait in quiet agony hoping Martin does not pass away before the ending is finished.
As far as the problems I have with the books, I will try to keep them short and simple for the purpose of the review.
First, the people who we are supposed to sympathize with Starks are all morons.
Eddard is a moron for announcing his intentions to Cersei, Robb and Catelyn are morons for siding with Renly over Stannis the rightful king and going to the home of a man known to break oaths.
Finally, the use of Deus ex Machina, its everywhere.
In short I like the books enough for what they are but the issues I have with the characters and inclusion of poorly written Deus ex Machina story coincidences is too great to ignore.
Bruno from Brazil I would just like to say that I really wanted to like this book.
I read about 500 pages and the story moves forward at such a slow pace that I couldn't bother reading further.
Every event feels like an obvious plot device, there is no culture, characters have no personality and no charisma whatsoever, there are too many storylines happening at the same time and none of them are in the least interesting, because the novel is structured in a way that when you start developing the slightest bit of sympathy towards a certain character the author ends the chapter, and the next chapter focuses on a completely different story arc with a different set of characters, much like the scenes in a soap opera.
There's no fantasy in this first volume of GoT except for dragon eggs, zombies, and swords with hilarious names.
Don't waste your time on this.
Peter from Netherlands Perhaps the literary con-job of the century.
Mediocre unoriginal writing that sets up a myriad of random story lines and finishes none.
Many people mistake this lazy haphazardly way of writing with the world being rich and the characters realistic, but is simply is a cheap trick invoked by a writer who probably has no idea how he's going to wrap everything up properly, not that this is a problem for him in the future.
I find it amazing how this parlor trick convinced so many people to run with this drivel, but that's the internet age for you.
Perhaps that is why he dislikes fanfic so much, knowing that his pulp isn't that far above the average slash nonsense.
If you want mindless entertainment, see the show and read a good book, not this MacDonalds fantasy wannabe.
Jarek from Usa I would like to start by saying that the fanboys ruined the series for me.
You know who I am talking about.
The people who belive that the books are absolutely perfect and the author is a god among men who we shall bow down to.
As for the books, I find that they start off fine, but somewhere down the line I believe that Martin has too much to focus on due to multiple characters and storylines needing to be written across varied locations spanning continents.
There really is too much to focus on for any writer, but then add in the obsessive amount of detail and its no wonder the books lose quality as they go on.
I believe what Martin should have done is kept things simple, one characters point of view and get straight into winter rather than letting the main issue wait for 5 books at 1000+ pages per book.
It really is more like we got to a party too soon while the decorations are still being set up for the main event.
The books are mediocre at best, I believe that a vast majority of the people who claim to be fans of this series only read it because of the show and were sorely disapointed.
Mike from South Wales Maybe you have to be a certain type to enjoy this kiit date booking genre of book?
It certainly did nothing whatsoever for me.
I find that if the first ten pages or so do not grab my attention then that is it.
This was certainly the case with Game of Thrones.
Sorry but I just do not see the attraction.
It was the most boring, long drawn out 4 chapters that I have ever read in my life and I will not be attempting to read anymore of it.
Erik from Germany I have a few problems with these books, first is the borderline obsessive detail, the amount of detail GRRM puts into these books prohibits you from seeing the world as you want to see it and limits you to the author's view.
The main problem for me however, is the multiple characters I do not care about at all.
So far after 5 books, only three really interest me, Tyrion, Jon, and Daenerys.
I really do not care what happens to anyone else at all.
The rest of the Starks and Lannisters could kill each other off for all I care.
At this point I just read the chapters concerning those three and read summaries for everyone else.
Rebekah from New Zealand This thick, material crammed theme free audio book money master the game think is written so brilliantly that it is impossible for one to get bored whilst reading.
I enjoy the fact that everyone is somehow connected in the story, no matter how far away they all seem from each other.
What additionally made this novel awesome was that at each end of chapters, GRRM would leave a cliff-hangar, forcing you to read on till it's 3:34 on a school morning.
Ron from Canada Reading this series has been just slowly watching anyone with any sort of morals die off.
It grows very tiresome very fast, at this point nothing could get me to continue reading what has become a series devoid of any characters I can sympathize with.
I'll read a synopsis when it ends just so I know how GRRM will finally kill this series.
Of course part of me also wishes GRRM will die before he finishes so the people who think this series is better than Tolkien's work will never get an ending.
Ewan from Scotland This book was the first book I finished on my own and not being forced English in school.
This book is so good that it made me, someone who would never even try a book.
Get into reading, you know it's good.
Toland from Scotland This is really the only series I will never bother to finish.
After reading through the first few books of this supposedly fantasy series I have to wonder where the fantasy is.
All I found was some bs about winter coming which wore down my patience so fast along with the overdone descriptions.
I believe at this point the success of the books more or less piggyback on the accesability of the tv show.
This is the only explanation I can find for the series success.
Victor from Canada I suppose that today's popularity of this book series comes directly from the HBO show.
The popularity of this TV show, on its part, comes from the realities that there are not many "medieval - fantasy" type of shows on today's television.
Therefore, when you don't have enough fish in the lake, every more or less decent crucian would be considered to be a local whale and a shark altogether.
The book is overrated.
The narration is flat and colorblind.
The monologues are emotionless and, for the most part, don't carry any story-progressing load on them.
The description of decorations, clothing and little details is pretty often redundant and used just to eat more pages that readers paid for, especially in the latest books.
Author uses his very first book to set up the chess pieces and intrigue the reader, but it is hard to distinguish when if the game actually starts, and while the reader is making his attempt to figure that out, some main characters are already dead, others have fallen away from the story line and don't play any part in it.
The only three stars I give are for the fist book, because initially it looked promising.
I don't know what percentage of HBO's profit goes into Martin's pocket, but the truth is, Martin should be the one who is paying HBO for forcing his luck of talent going mainstream.
Joe from USA I made it to only slightly more than halfway through Book 1.
It is the only novel I can ever remember not finishing.
Matteo from Italy Not really a novel, rather a soap opera screenplay for sex-dreaming male kids with a taste for the shallow and the useful free da vinci code book download this />Also, a very good business for the author.
Infesting, as parasite vines.
Avoid at all cost.
Alice from England I will give it just over half stars, purely because I think that the concept is brilliant, and the series begins very strongly, with the first book in particular being excellent.
However, sadly, what could have been an explosive series slowly dissolved into an anti climax with absolutely nothing happening.
Book one, and most of book two are very good, book three has some interesting parts, although admittantly it begins to loose structure, book four however, I struggled with despite flying through the preceding books and I gave up on book five.
It seems that the interesting characters that Martin established in the first book have either been killed off or their storylines have dried out and have subsequently been replaced with much less interesting characters and storylines.
All in all, the disappointment factor when reflecting upon what this story could have been is perhaps the worst thing about it.
It could have been great, and it has its moments, but when you look at the potential that Martin had to begin with, which slowly dissolves into nothing, it's just such a shame that he couldn't carry it out and that's the worst thing about the series, the dreadful waste of potential.
Still, I wouldn't say avoid it completely, just be aware that this story will probably not play out the way you had hoped and you may well find yourself as disappointed as I was.
Alex from Greece I absolutely loved it, the whole idea, the writting style.
I do not get why everyone disses that "Dance with Dragons" fifth book though.
I found it quite interesting.
Maria from US "Six" as a rating is deceptive.
I gave 10 to the first three books, and single stars to the last two books, and 6-7 is what I got.
Sadly, the last two books take all the momentum of the first three, and flush it down the toilet.
I wish they didn't.
I'm waiting for book six, and hoping that Martin gets his act together, but at this point the story is so bloated that it's unlikely to happen.
If anyone wants an excellent series that moves like a well-oiled machine from start to finish, try Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy.
However gradually this 'epic' seems to loose all momentum and direction, it is when you begin to realize that there are entire chapters in the book that you do not care about, entire chapters that are so mind numbingly dull and uninsightful, that you could happily skip them.
Words become words, everything takes so long, too long to arrive at a destination.
The most interesting stories seem to end abruptly or with an inadequate solution and you begin to notice that the more words that are written the more the books loose all sense of direction, you become unattached from all characters and stories and its a shame because the world which has been created is sublime, however the way in which this 'epic' is told just does not do justice to the first two books and the direction it was originally heading in.
Kate from UK Half way through book 5 ' A Dance with Dragons' and losing the will to live.
On the back of the TV series the first two books were enjoyable enough with sympathetic characters and some genuine boo hiss baddies to hate but by book 4 we were flagging and book 5 is simply dreadful.
Self indulgent repetitive and pointless.
Dany continues to play the stroppy teenager before finally getting laid having dumped her dragons in a pit on noticing they aren't house-trained.
Martin clearly doesn't care about his characters so how can we?
So utterly disdainful is he of his readers that he ends his books with a self pitying winge about what a bitch it all has been for him to write.
Well not nearly as big a bitch as it was to lay out good money then waste hours of our lives reading this self indulgent piffle mate.
Wayne from US Awesome book, enticing read.
Love the series and people complaining how it's poorly written.
This is really a great series, not a single one of you could even come close to matching Martin's writing.
Mamushet from Washington DC I would have to say that the world GRRM created is interesting.
But the series is over extended and loses its appeal after the first two books.
The fourth and fifth books are filled with repetitions and tedious details.
The book starts by building some anticipation for the arrival of winter yet you will have to read five books to get there.
It is like watching 15 min boring commercial for 2 min show.
Greblixx from Germany Avoid this mediocre book.
It's more than loss of time.
It's a nonsensical mess.
Book 4 and 5 have absolutely nothing to say and all the characters are primitive.
It seems that the author just wants to set a record of number of pages lacking of any substance.
Jayne from United States For a while, I've been trying to figure out how I feel about these books I've read all 5.
They're a deviation from the traditional fantasy storyline hero that overcomes all vs.
I do think he does it well, the story is well written and always keeps you guessing.
I didn't have a problem with the multiple characters and their separate chapters I made it through the Wheel of Time series and loved itbut I did have a problem with caring what happens.
I like that Mr.
Martin has no qualms about killing off whatever character needed to die and the revolving complexity of the plot is really interesting.
But honestly, what I think he lost between the multiple characters and their impermanence was making me care about the character.
I think he shows their negative sides much more than any goodness in them and in not knowing how long they're going to be around, I found myself avoiding getting too emotionally involved in their stories to the point that I just don't really care what happens to them anymore.
I also agree with another reviewer here in that somewhere the overall plot gets lost.
Also I'm just confused about the role of the whole "winter is coming" idea - I would like to see that come to more prominence because I could see that forcing everyone to set aside their differences and their petty politics to fight a common foe - and it's seemed like that since the very first chapter.
Overall, I say kudos to Mr.
Martin for daring to break the traditional fantasy click to see more and hopefully opening a whole new realm of possibilities for other writers but I hope that after this series, he learns from his mistakes and writes a much better one.
I give it 6 stars for boldness, creativity, interesting characters and good writing.
Nobody from USA Wow, you are comparing Martin to Tolkien?
If I could pick a fantasy author to recommend to someone looking for something to equal or best Tolkien's LoTR, it would have to be Gene Wolfe, and the Urth series.
Phil from US Book 1, good -- Book 2, OK --- Book 3, hoping something happens that doesn't waste Book 1.
Book 4, didn't finish, no ending could be worth the bother.
I've read "War and Peace", Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" twiceSelby Foote's "The Civil War", the Literary Digest's "History of the World War" WWI, all ten volumes https://filmman.ru/book/slots-books.html I even took a crack at the Encyclopedia Britannica when I was 12 and home sick for a month.
I've read some part of a book every day for over 50 years, since I was able to read anything.
And never, ever have I abandon a book in mid-stream not even Joyce's "Ulysses" or even James' "The Golden Bowl", which, while brilliant are a slog for a modern reader.
It's bloated, filled with characters no one can care about, and too many points of view.
The only way to end this series is to kill off nearly everyone and since there are so many characters the reader can hardly care.
As Stalin is reputed to have said, "one death is a tragedy, a million deaths are a statistic.
Felix from America An absoloutely brilliant novel.
In my opinion, A Game of Thrones is one of the greatest fantasy novels ever written by one of the best authors ever.
George RR Martin is able to capture emotions and build suspense and leaves you wanting more.
A truly great novel.
Jake from Australia To all the haters, you're entitled to your opinion.
I like to recall the story of how the producers of the TV show read a part of the first book and were immediately overwhelmed, impressed, taken by the imagery, the ambience, the sense of place and the characters.
So, at least 2 people in the world were touched by the book.
Now that's 2 more than a lot of other writers.
Cristoff from Australia Too long winded, too much focus on tedious details.
The basic Premise for the novels is good in my opinion, But really needed to be written by someone like J.
Rowling who knows how to filter out Blab.
The second half of the third book is the most interesting to read while the whole fourth book made me want to scure my eye balls with a hot iron poker.
Yngvar from Norway I have been going through books 1-4 now, and I must say that I sometimes could not get off the book, it's exciting.
But many other times I really relent starting a new chapter, especially when I see that the chapter title is "Sansa" or "Catelyn".
There are way too much text in which nothing ever happens, nor the monolouge is interesting.
Worst of all is the vast number of too-long descriptions of what people are wearing!
Or how things look!
Got damnit, that's so uninteresting!
Anthony from UK To those who say the writing isn't good, I challenge you to write at Martin's level.
The different pespectives add depth to the story but I understand that some people might have trouble understanding.
I wish to note that in no mean I judge the series alltogether.
Martin have created an interesting world with lots of likeable charachters, epic article source and unique in a sense playing with reader.
The problem I have is that it's boring.
No, not the story, however overdone and simple, but the narrative.
Never have I reade such flat descriptions and emotionless dialouge, not to mention forced expositions.
Honestlythe idea of charachter perspective told story with each chapter being presented from pov of different one involved in an event is nice, the execution is less than impressive.
If not for the HBO show I would have hard time getting into the presented world.
Another thing are all the Deus Ex Machina literaly forcing the plot to continue the intended way.
HBO patches some holes, adds here, takes away there and makes the story overall better and of course.
Puts life into the charachters and dialogue!
I hope the other books of the series are better because so far my jaw hurts from yawning.
Darren from Manchester I can only really use two words to rate this book you can apply the same two words to the entire series to be truthful - Over Rated.
I have seen people rate this alongside Tolkien or Ursula Le Guin, Martin couldn't and doesn't hold a candle to those writers nor about 10 others whom are far superior.
Try reading the Mistborn Series Brandon Sanderson or Malazan Series Steven Erikson and then re-assess Martin, I will guarantee you opinion how to beat book of ra slot machine have changed : Andrew from USA Game of Thorns is a good book, but it is intro to a bad series.
I have many click to see more for the book but the biggest and most important one is the singular fault with Eddard Stark.
That being when he learns of what the Queen has done.
Eddard to this point in the book the whole book almost has done the "right thing" no matter how much it hurts himself, family, anyone.
At the finally moment when doing the "right thing" would mean justice for his family and protect his family, he doesn't do it.
Instead he makes an offer with the Queen instead of exposing her.
Martin had a good book and a good beginning to a series until that moment.
It went downhill from there, and really is just unreadable.
Gordon from Oklahoma, USA A Game of Thrones, and the rest of the Fire and Ice series, are the finest stories I have read in many years, and I am a prolific reader who enjoys many different categories of literature.
After having read Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy as well as the Hobbit a few years ago while the Peter Jackson movies were being progressively released, I am of the opinion that "A Game of Thrones" and the entire Fire and Ice series to this point are several steps above anything Tolkien ever wrote.
An added bonus is the result of HBO is doing a great job of bringing the Fire and Ice books to the homes of people who would never consider picking up a 1000 page novel.
Anybody who bothers to read each of the books from both writers can count themselves lucky to be able to enjoy such well written literature.
For those who have seen the HBO series and enjoyed it so far, you should read A Game of Thrones and decide for yourself if the written material is superior to the theatrical release.
I would also put this series above the Harry Potter books and movies.
Emily from England Read it because of the series on television and am not ashamed.
It does include adult scenes, which I thought fitted the atmosphere of the novel and I am a teenager, so it is understandable I would find them more awkward.
You can't complain about not understanding the novel if you don't read all of it, including the 'boring' parts.
All the Tolkien lovers need to broaden their horizons.
GRRM isn't trying to be Tolkien, he's an epic writer on his own with his own style.
Kah from Brazil This is modernity, I guess.
The way of narrating a story has certainly changed.
Things are about discourse and action, now.
This is a great epic which is providing nice adaptations.
Of course, the plot is very long and, because of this, its quality oscilates sometimes.
I myself didn't like the fourth book the first three books were an amazing experience and the fifth has been little playful.
But this is not about comparing G.
M to Tolkien or Lewis.
This is about accepting what this generation is producing and understand it withouth making anacronisms.
Highfantasy from Pakistan I have few complaints: The books are filled with far too many subplots, characters and POVs.
I wonder why add them when Martin has to kill and burn everything, I found this practice to be rather masochistic, reminiscent of Peakes' Gormenghast trilogy.
How much detail is enough and how many time does he has to repeat them?
For instance Old Bear's Raven sitting on his shoulder and repeats last word of every sentence he says and he is awarded with corn, Ghost is warm, Bran is crippled, Catelyn is a women, Sansa is a complete fool, Davos has moving his finger less hand and Danerys deserves a slap.
I liked the story but it's way too long and tiresome to read, endless and repetitive details ruined it.
I cannot get past the third book.
Thomas from England I would like to point out that the book being reviewed is Game Of Thrones, not the whole series, A Song Of Ice And Fire, which many people seem to be forgetting.
M from USA Utter crap.
To compare this to Tolkien WHO CREATED THE MODERN FANTASY GENRE is inexcusable and ignorant.
Typical of most modern entertainment, it is nothing more than a writer's endless quest for cash and fame.
Sadly after 3 decades as a fan of the fantasy genre I have stopped reading fantasy novels as the genre like so many other things in this modern world have been cheapened and turned to crap.
To all those people who love reality TV.
Eric Showatt from Australia People seem to think the reason why the opinion about this series is so divided because the way the author kills off the character and the amount of angst, miseries this series content.
While this may seem like a plausible reason, the real reason is here far more simple.
Game of Thrones sucks.
Now I'm not here to troll or bash the author - I'm here to review this series honestly.
There is no doubt in my mind that GRRM is one of the most prolific writer of our time.
His world building ability is on par with Tolkien, and the character he has created are very realistic and interesting.
One can almost read Game of throne like an alternative history if we forget all the magical element within the story.
The political motivation of each character are very well defined and the consequences for failure in this series are heavy - you are lucky if you managed to die a clean death, as is the case with Ned Stark.
He died, sure, but there are many character who ended up wishing they were dead but couldn't quite manage it https://filmman.ru/book/book-of-ra-game-slot-machine-free.html their tormentors prevent them from doing so.
There is beauty in this book.
Beauty in the finality of death and the cruelty of living.
I would like to ask every reviewer and every reader of Game of Thrones, what is the actual plot of this series?
Lots of things happen, sure.
You get loads and loads of characters.
Each of them have their own arc.
Some gets killed off, some don't, but are any of them truly relevant?
Just consider this for a second and you will see what an appalling story the series is - it's not actually a story.
It's many story woven into one book, like a game that contains several character sheet and no main plot whatsoever.
Things unfold, but it's just things that happens.
If I were to describe what this story is about, I would simply say "It's a book about a bunch of things that happened in a land called Westeros", and that's pretty much what the series has become by the end of the third book.
Now I will go on to say that the first book is simply breath taking.
There is actually a plot, and the characters pov are consistent and - most importantly - relevant.
You get the honorable idiot Ned Stark who is trying to figure out why Jon Arryn was killed, while his wife and kids are trying to figure out who pushed Bran off the balcony.
The two conspiracies tied together, because what Bran witnessed was the key to Ned Stark's hunt for the reason why Jon Arryn is killed and why he is becoming involved in the first place.
The subplot with Dany?
That's just the icing on the cake, like something that you can either read or ignore completely.
The tradition continues on to the second book, after Ned stark's tragedy, the land is divided and the war happens.
We see the brutal aftermath, we see the people fighting for the Iron Throne.
While the plot began to dwindle after the first book, the characters are presented with one goal visit web page that is to fight for the Iron Throne, with a subplot of getting their loved ones back to safety.
However, after the third book everything went downhill.
The war is more or less resolved.
The winner and losers are already evident.
Major character are killed off, new ones are introduced but none of them are coherent anymore.
Everything literally becomes "just shit that happens", and the entire series has become a wait for "something to happen".
And that's why the series has become such a disappointment in so many eyes.
If anyone has to ball to say GRRM can't write for a damn, they have no business in writing or creative industry in general.
However, if anyone says reading A Song of Ice and Fire is becoming increasingly pointless, then you have my sympathy.
I've no doubt that things are going to change now that Dany and Tyrion is coming back to the mainland to reclaim their home, but as it stands today, Game of Thrones is a massive disappointment that has a strong beginning but poorly executed plot throughout the middle.
Chris from Scotland Having just ploughed through the final published book in the series to date, I can only echo all of the sentiments previously expressed by some of the more erudite reviewers and I definitely fall into "the don't waste your time camp".
I did enjoyed the first HBO series in a superficial way but was disappointed download of ra game series 2.
Talk about milking it, I for one won't be giving the man who reminds me of a character in Lord of The Rings any more of my hard earned dosh.
Manpreet from India This book is full of all the emotions and elements; https://filmman.ru/book/free-game-online-book-of-ra.html book is a journey full of violence, treachery, loyalty honesty, love, families, romance, conspiracies, back stabbing and much more.
I have read The Lord of the Rings, and I am not adverse to very long series The Wheel of Time is still going and I have no qualms with thatbut Game of Thrones is SO overrated I can scarcely believe it.
The first three books are alright.
Minus a few incredibly laughable and cringey sex scenes and some truly awful characters there are a few interesting scenes one every fifty pages maybe.
I bought them and I do not feel like it was a complete waste of time, but really I do not feel like I have read something exceptional, just an average book, the kind that I have read once and will probably forget after a few years.
The fourth book however.
I can honestly say I have never found a story so dull.
The action is sporadic at best, and dispersed so thinly between sections equivalent to three smaller novels that it really did not feel worth searching for them.
The description lacks originality, the characters are unrealistically extreme and generally just quite irritatingand what few interesting characters Martin did start out with are long gone by the fourth book, lost to unrealistic shifts in character the rating game book pointless and unengaging death scenes that are not in any way emotionally affecting.
Maybe it is just my personal taste, but really?
I am shocked at how much hype this has got.
I thought it was just an embarrassment to read, and I am giving my copy to charity as soon as I can.
Maja from Croatia I studied literature and know that some of the best books ever written did not develop stories, characters and endings the way the audience wants or deserves.
It's not a matter of a compromise.
However, these days, for the fact of globalisation we as readers want to think that the the rating game book, the author and the reader are one big factory.
I prefer waiting for each book sequence in suspense, even if it does not satisfy war of the worlds free expectations.
JRRM's Song of Ice and Fire in my opinion is simply amazing, and it's definitively not easy to read.
It's like an expanding storm that swirls the characters and plots in concentric circles.
Consumes time for sure, and if you think it's too long - you should read shorter books.
If you think it's overly descriptive - you're missing the beauty of visualisation of every spot and object and character, when you should be grateful to JRRM for letting you see what he is seeing.
It's not a one-read-book and will show you something new every time you reread.
Hans from Belgium I enjoyed reading it.
And i will finish it.
This is mainly because i believe the story has enormous potential to endand i quote the great academic J Clarksonon ' a bombshell'.
But i do have to critisize a bit.
The book is frustratingly long.
Jonathan from United States This is a great and wonderful read, from start to finish it keeps you guessing and gets you involved with each and every character, so much so that https://filmman.ru/book/ariel-book-maker-game.html find yourself falling in love with each one of them, even the not so nice ones, and if you see a bad rating it's simply because that person did not get it or understand the plot.
Anon from Sydney, Australia It's not that the author is trying to say that good people die, it's just that a lot of people really don't get what goes on.
It's the most cunning and luckiest that survive.
The characters do tend to change quickly from time to time, which would level my rating down a bit, and some of the characters I love to hate.
It is unpredictable and the last two books have been a droll, again lowering my rating.
Overall, it's a great fantasy book, and better in quality than a lot of other fantasy novels.
The lore is immersive and detailed, though some parts unecessary.
The book may have started out as Lancaster vs York as in War of the Roses, which is what the books are based on but now it's turned into a massive fight for dominance over land and power, with no one exactly safe and leaving a lot of hype.
Do hope Martin picks up in the next book and hurries it up a bit.
And I don't get why people say the good guys always lose.
The good guys occasionally triumph.
For the people saying that they want to argue why it's not good, wish there was a comment section.
Jon from UK Captain Frogbert, you a clearly a moron who is obsessed with LOTR.
I really don't even know where to start with how wrong you are on every point you made in your review of this book.
If you are really that upset with this book you should just go read LOTR another eleventy twelve times and leave the rest of us alone.
Anon from Anon OMG I have just finished the blooming lot of them and I have to exactly the same confusion, I am utterly exasperated that barely a plot line has been concluded.
The whole thing after the quite good Clash of Kings has become an utter nonsense, time I will never get back.
Sean from Australia It's ok.
He's not a particularly good writer, in terms of characterisation some of the pov writing of the younger characters is execrable and the book is pointlessly long.
I have severe difficulty in accepting that any reader who gave this book 10 stars has seriously thought at all about the possibility that a 15 year old could successfully lead a hardened army into battle without a viceroy pulling he tactical strings or that a 4 year old would be capable of being the master of a a wild wolf.
Ok it's fantasy, but that doesn't mean it has to be total b.
If it wasn't for Tyrion the book would stink quite badly.
Convolution is no substitute for good writing, by the way.
Good for fantasy writing but it ain't great.
Watch the series instead, still contains a teeth- gratingnumber of 'yes, my liege' type conversations, but again, Tyrion saves the day.
Guy from England I am outraged at the position of this series on the top 100 list.
This should be at least second the Malazan Book Of The Fallen is also AWSOME.
Out of the many, many books that I have read these are my favourite: the many interwoven storylines are well thoughtout and presented.
The books set a new level of fantasy, portraying a brutal, gritty and mature story with many hundreds of realistic characters.
There are no good vs evil here, no the rating game book powered imortal heroes.
Martin is a master writer, he leaves you laughing and weeping and it is extremly easy to loose yourselve in his world.
Once I got the first book purchased on a whim I was hooked and had read the whole series on the inside of a month.
The book was ok.
Einar from Norway I am sorry to say that I have read five volumes, while my frustration has been steadily increasing.
All the plots are still hanging in the air.
The time I spent reading these books feels like a waste of time, and I can absolutely not recommend them to anybody.
Matthew from US Boring.
It's not that I don't get it.
It's simply that nothing happens.
People try to say that if you don't like it you are not smart enough to understand all the intricacies and nuances, or whatever, but I think that the opposite is true.
I think that it is less intelligent people that are easily wrapped up in that stuff.
It's just like a soap opera.
There is no story.
There is no point.
I can't believe this ever got published, let alone made into a show.
PS I usually try to avoid saying this, but since a guy pointed out his genius level IQ in his good review, I want to point out that I also have a genius level IQ.
Karen from England The Review, Part 2.
To cut a long story short, this might have made a decent trilogy, but frankly, life's too short for stuff that goes on.
Karen from England Just started this a couple of days ago, Martin is a new writer to me and after reading the reviews I've got to say I've never seen a fantasy author divide opinion so much.
Five stars based on what I've read so far, although that might change in the course of time.
Tyrion Lannister - best character so far, no contest.
Andy from uk the most engrossing read i just couldnt put it down.
John from Canada I did not enjoy book one from the first sentence, although there is a soap opera quality about the lame writing style that keeps tricking you that some time down the road, something by the middle of the book ANYTHING would have been good will happen eventually.
By three quarters of the way through, I was still on the verge of putting it down, especially since after 600 or so pages I was still basically uninterested in a single character, and I've seen Bazooka Joe comics with more depth, but that soap opera drug laced in between the lines kept me going.
Until a war breaks out between the Lannisters and the Starks, and Martin describes the horns as having a haroooooooooooooo sound, and the Lannister trumpets as a Do-DA, Do-DAAAAAAAAAAAA.
I have never laughed so hard as I put a book down in my life.
We have an author who trumped his own horrible writing with a trumpet.
Nice attempt at onomatopoeia.
Uday from Canada I think most of the readers giving negative remarks just either can't take the complexity of the story or are the kind of people that have to have everybody live and have a corny happy ending.
I mean one of the great things that GRRM has done with this series is how he makes you really love the characters-yes even Cersei- and how he isn't afraid of actually killing off those characters.
That alone makes the story so much more interesting and suspenseful, because you never know when any character might die.
Also, as for those of you saying that you don't see the importance of characters like Jon, Dany and Sansa you just haven't read far enough into the series.
They're chapters become very interesting and you can really relate to them.
The first three books have to be the best.
The characters are rich, writing style superb, more of the fantasy and magic further on in the series and way the chapters are split really make you see things on a much larger scale and make you appreciate the effort of all that detail even more.
Another thing, it takes lots of superb writing and imagination to not just use the "magic" part of fantasy to solve all of the conflicts, and than you can appreciate characters like Tyrion who use their intellect a lot more.
If you liked the Wheel of Time I feel you will like the Song of Ice and Fire series just as much or more.
Doto from Ruskiland The first 2 books were good I thought.
The rest felt like author already ran out of anything new to say and were full of filler.
The characters started to turn from believable to completely poor.
The story stopped advancing.
Then the author started to introduce 999999999 different characters that I was starting to get lost in not to mention completely not care about while the characters I thought were interesting were dropped or have a few uninteresting chapters filled with adjective filler instead of witty dialogue or plot.
I recommend first 1-2 books the rest are just cash cow.
Jake from United States Personally, I find people who really criticize this series only look at things on the surface it's too long, too many characters, too graphic, poor characters, etc.
They don't look at things deeper, try and see why things are the way they are, and just think of this great series as a pointless kill fest.
In reality, a lot of the space is meant to build tension and expand on things, the characters are much deeper than people give them credit for, and if you can't follow along then there is nothing I can do for you.
Also, why would anyone say Martin's writing is bad?
I think his prose is excellent and really develops emotion, atmosphere, and setting.
Brian from USA Do yourself a favor and read Lackey's collaborative series that starts with 'The Shadow of the Lion' about convoluted politics in byzantine fantasy Italy if you are interested in gritty, deeply-laid plots, rich character development, and epic scope in a fantasy world.
Don't get me wrong, I genuinely like Martin.
His collaboration with, and editing of, the Wildcard series probably changed the face and raised the bar of the entire superhero genre for all time, but this particular series evokes echoes of L.
Ron Hubbard more than it does Tolkien, Machiavelli, or Jordan.
Colby from USA Where to start?
A few years back my cousin made it his mission to get everyone in our circle of friends to read the series.
When news hit that HBO was going to make a show out of it and all my friends raving about the series I decided "why not" and gave the first book a try.
Didn't hate the book but was definitely let down.
Gave Martin the benefit of the doubt that this book was just used as introduction and setup for the rest of the series, and that I was in for a ride.
Made it through the first 200 pages of the third book and.
I can't say this is a BAD book by any means.
I just find it very convoluted and overrated.
Martin seems so determined to ram quantity over quality down throat.
Too many characters, plot lines, and too many descriptions of each.
It reminds me of going to a restaurant that has everything on the menu, from sushi, steaks, chicken wings, spaghetti, chili, enchiladas, lobster, and pizza, and none of it turns out very good.
I'd rather have the eatery that focuses and bangs out a few key specialties every night.
I found it very hard to connect with the characters when I'd read about them for 1 chapter and then have them disappear for 80 pages at a time.
There were times where I'd already forget what said POV character was doing the last time I read about him because of the length of absence.
I've read the first 2.
Or Jon Snow for that matter.
Cut these two out and I don't see how the main plot changes.
Even when someone dies, 2-3 more characters are added which diminishes the whole point of the dying character's death.
I also thought fantasy books were supposed to contain fantasy?
It merely seems to be sprinkled in so far instead of embracing it.
What I'm seeing so far is two main parties Starks and Lannisters fighting over who runs the country, I could turn it to C-SPAN and watch that.
For something that is deemed as fantasy, it's incredibly down to earth.
I don't mind sex reads and gory violence if it's done right.
I mean, 50 Shades of Grey is quite popular right now with the former.
Martin's scenes though just seem to be spontaneous acts to show.
I don't know what.
As if everyone does it to pass the time.
It's the kind of reading I would have loved when I was a horny 14 year old kid but as an adult I don't see it adding anything.
Last criticism, the pacing of the story is way too slow for my taste.
Most of this is due to the excessive number of characters and sub plots.
Martin ends up weighing the series down rather moving it along.
I want the small sports car that zips down the highway, not the diesel that lumbers and slugs along.
All of this could have been avoided if Martin would simply realize that his story contains fat in need of trimming.
The greatest authors can tell a fantastic story in the least amount of words.
Since there are plenty of Lord of the Rings comparisons, here's another.
Counting the Hobbit, Tolkien was able to create Middle-Earth in roughly 1200-1300 pages.
Martin has already written about 4000 pages and is nowhere close to finishing his tale.
Leads me to believe he can't bring it all together.
But let me end on what Martin does get right.
He can deem up a few entertaining characters, whether good or evil.
Joffrey and Cersei might be despicable, loathsome characters but we'd be bored without them.
Then we have the devious cunning of Littlefinger and Tyrion.
Or the wise beyond her years, Arya.
Also, when something actually does happen for a change, Martin does a really good job keeping the reader entertained and eagerly turning the pages until I get to a Sansa or Dany chapter that is.
The climax and twists genuinely did keep me guessing as to what happens next.
Again, this is not a bad series but could have been so much more.
My advice, skip the books and watch the HBO series.
It keeps the relevant story bits and edits out the cumbersome pace of the books.
Forrest from Florida I will admit, the first three books had me enthralled.
However, when I started turning the pages of book four, I started skipping paragraphs, pages and finally chapters.
I understand if you want to tell a story from multiple perspectives, but I would rather not read from a characters perspective that I detest, it's annoying.
Pray do tell, what is the point of giving the ENTIRE history of an unlikable character ex: Cerseijust for them to remain hated, with no advancement of the story?
Also, when the entirety of every sixth paragraph focuses on what the character is eating, with excruciating detail, it becomes repetitive and boring.
That, and the overly descriptive nature of every character and castle make this story a screenplay, not a book.
Ed from California This complete series is a promise of things to come.
Every interesting character disappears in one way or another.
How repetitive can you get?
It seems like Martin's plot was to disappoint us with every character.
What aggravates me the most is that the story and characters had such potential when it began.
I suggest you read the first couple books and get out of Dodge, unless you prefer "Rocky Balboa gets killed in a car crash on his way to the fight"!
I have had this dream before.
Wes from Australia First off - this series isn't for everyone.
It introduces a lot link characters, so if you struggle with that you won't like it.
Second, no one is safe.
For this, I love the series.
But for many people who need to have their heroes survive - you will hate this.
Third, the writing is long - but beautifully written, and I think some people will miss a lot of the intricacies and don't quite get the writing style.
This series breaks a lot of convention, but if you can handle that and have the patience you will love it!
If you struggle with multiple characters, need a safe happy warm ending and like a more traditional style this series isn't for you, and frankly that is where a lot of these negative comments are coming from.
Also many of the negative reviews abandoned the series early on, and in my opinion the second volume of Storm of Swords is where it gets amazing.
One reviewer felt characters got killed off and the story arcs ended there - to that, I say they aren't getting the bigger picture, but I won't say specifics as not to reveal any spoilers.
Bear in mind it will be years before the next book, so if you don't want to wait that long and possibly many years after that for the final book then you might want to avoid the series.
Jon from England Overall, a very good series.
The last two not so good, but still a reasonable read I'm hoping that Martin will pick up his game again for the next books.
It's been levelled here that he's not the best writer in the world and that's probably fair, but then neither was Tolkien and he was an Oxford don and I'm unlikely to read Erikson or Jordan for their literary value either, if it comes to it.
He tells a good story and, whilst they're not as atypical as some reviews might like to suggest, he creates characters that you actually care about.
This is evidenced here by the number of peole moaning about how he's killed off their favourite characters - it wouldn't upset you if you didn't like them.
One thing that I particularly like about the series is the sparing use of magic.
It's always been an annoyance in fantasy that when faced with a difficult situation, the writer could quite literally wave a magic wand at it.
It also increases the impact on the reader when there actually is magic.
As a result, this isn't a series for fans of more overtly magical fantasy.
There aren't wizards, elves, goblins and orcs pouring out of the woodwork here.
I think that due to the size of the series, there are now a lot of plot strands for Martin to hold together.
This means that, firstly, it's tough to follow some times and secondly, it's tough for Martin to write.
As a result, it takes him a while to get each installment written, so you need patience and a good memory.
Finally, there's a lot of sex and violence.
Ivan from Canada Wow, these books are incredible.
Best books I've ever read.
Do not listen to the trolls calling it poorly written.
The number of different story lines and character incentives is incredible.
booking for learning licence in too much for some readers to understand and they get lost with the amount of characters.
Do yourself a favour and get these books!!!!!
Brett from Canada Not sure if half the people are elitest or the other half are fanboys but I found the book very engrossing, funny and angering at times although I hate that he killed off my 3 favorite characters.
Emina from Melbourne, Australia I haven't read the book, and after reading most of the reviews I have no desire to.
I mean even, when the movie came out I didn't really find the plot that interesting, or should I say the idea.
Also, to the really super smart "genius" above, what does an IQ have to do with what you like??
Yours, was by far the stupidest comment ever!
Hazel from Canada Mediocre writing.
Killing with no apparent direction.
Despite my disappointment in these areas I read the first book long enough to be taken hostage by the characters only to be gravely disappointed I'd ever continued later on in the series.
Sad from United States Those reviews make me really sad.
Basically, people are just coming to GRRM books because they cannot read, and are watching HBO series.
Both the TV series and the books are really bad.
First, there is the constant repetition of words in sentences and sentences in paragraphs.
Is like a copy and paste work of a lazy writer.
Second, characters are really shallow.
None of them have any serious psychological crossroads and issues, they are just the same hack-and-slash brutes, or honorable-idiot-naive, in different nuances.
Third, the world building is basically pathetic.
How can a planet have winters of decades that don't even follow a regular pattern?
Also, deserts grow south, while the north the cold part, how creative.
So, that planet must have some very eccentric orbit.
There is no folklore, there is no culture, there are no strong religions, just a mix-up of our Earth religions and taken from the summaries on an Elementary school encyclopedia.
Fourth, he keeps repeating himself because he is a really bad writer that "writes as he goes", so he needs a lot of Deus Ex Machina events on order to solve the issues and questions that are carried out through the books.
And, nevertheless, he cannot make the story get a proper pace.
I, unfortunately, had to read the five books two times, one on a basis of 150 to 200 pages per day, and the second time, on a fixed basis of 50 pages per day, as I had to make a complete, encyclopedic, critical summary, with all the style mistakes, a deep analysis of plots and characters, and so on.
So, I can consider myself a specialist in this series, and that is why I can state: it is really one of the worse literary works in the history of Mankind.
Pete Bates from UK Maurice felt the need to state he has an IQ of 147, this makes him anything but a genius.
As for the book, it's over-indulgent.
The plot itself is overly complex, hindering rather than aiding the story as a whole.
They're too many narrative strands just leading to a slow moving behemoth with all its meaning being saturated in too many separate narratives.
He tries to incorporate too much of his stories fabula and world into the story creating a contrived, mess of narratives.
His world is rich and this could have been shown to greater effect in a far more controlled narrative.
Martin appears to be a man with many great ideas whilst lacking the control to properly put them into practice.
Maurice from Cayman Islands Anyone not loving this series must be seriously dull or retarded.
I have an IQ of 147, making me a genius and have read just about all the great fantasy series.
This series yields to none.
Alex from Italy The best book I ever read, just finished the third book and I can't get enough of it!
Andy from Ottawa, Canada When I read these books and I did read 1-5 there was not one moment where I was not totally into it.
After book 1-3 there are no requirements for big battles scenes at least until the characters are deemed ready to do so.
Its fantasy, its action, its drama, its horror, its all I need all at once.
Michael from Sydney I have to agree with the more negative reviews: the first couple of books are not too bad, but its going downhill and it soon loses its way.
Characters seem to be killed off for no particular reason and entire plot-lines disappear with them and are not replaced by anything interesting.
The series is bloated and self-indulgent.
Its a shame because it seemed to have so much potential as I read the first book.
First lesson that Martin needs to learn: Less is More.
The great authors understand this and their books are still being read decades later: Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, Le Guin's Earthsea, Howard's Link, Moorcock's Elric.
Martin doesn't get it and I don't have time to read to the end of an increasingly turgid five-part series to indulge him.
Alan from Canada The first 2 books are great, 3 is mildly entertaining but not great.
Stopped reading the 4th book midway through.
Too bad nobody thought Martin needed an editor.
Less is more, pal.
Gary from England Started reading this series of books after being amazed by the HBO Series.
I thought the first 2 books really drew you in to the stories and made you care for and hate the characters.
Unfortunately from book 3 onwards the story has lost it's edge and Martin seems to be telling the story for the sake of it rather than developing the characters we once cared for, he seems to think that killing of the people we root for is a way of keeping the reader interested, it ultimately has the reverse effect.
It reminds my of lots of US series such as Lost, Fringe and many more who have an excellent early series but then struggle to maintain the intensity.
I am currently reading A Dance with Dragons and even though I already have Winds of Winter waiting in the wings I may not even bother opening it if A dance with Dragons continues with it's plod through the seven kingdoms.
Cathy from Ohio No denying that George R.
Martin is a talented author and plot initiator.
Each release was a greater and greater disappointment.
He is nothing compared to Tolkien, where a true not casino spiele book of ra kostenlos And was woven and hope against a crueler world was presented to a thirsty audience.
These books just present cruelty and avarice as mankind's inheritance - perfect for Hollywood.
Plato from Timbuktu Nice writing style, excellent plot, amazing world.
I love how Martin weaves together seemingly unconnected plotlines and shows us so many perspectives, giving us a much more sophisticated understanding of the story.
The world Martin created is awesomely huge and complicated, although the endless introductions of new characters can be hard to get into.
Also, the not-deaths get pretty annoying after a while.
Other than this, I have no criticism for the series, and am eagerly awaiting the release of the 6th book.
Ron from USA I love fantasy.
I read to escape the world and maybe learn a bit along the way.
But when I read this book I actually wanted to escape it, rather than use it as an escape.
The characters are dark, and the only decent ones are either subjected to horrible circumstances and changed to be dark, or killed.
There are a few interesting characters but they are shoved to the side to make way for the more "interesting and human" characters that go around killing and raping.
This book is slow, boring, and dark, and if that's what you want then good for you.
But if you want a book that's interesting, or just actually goes anywhere in less than 5 books, than you should probably look elsewhere.
Nat from India Well I had heard a lot about this book online and saw that it had got great reviews from everyone, moreover the HBO series of AGOT was also there so I finally decided to read this one.
The book is um something very unique and good in its own way.
It's gritty and mature more to the extent than I had anticipated, the plot is laid out brilliantly.
The storyline and characters are good though it seems that Martin according to me didn't satisfactorily end it.
The tortures through which the characters are put through and it seems that Martin's focus on keeping things like this makes me wonder that there won't be a great ending to this thing and things would cross to such an extent that it wouldn't matter at all.
One more thing is that it's surprising a bit that there is absolutely next to no magic though there are some fantasy elements but for most of the times it seems like maybe a non fantasy novel.
The book was with all things still great.
Full of twists and surprises.
Definitely a good read though maybe not for everyone.
Gary A from Australia Books 1 and 2 are great.
Book 3 is ok.
Books 4 and 5 are garbage.
The fact that books 4 and 5 are are garbage makes everythig in the first three books garbage as well.
The plots that were set up in the first two books all just melt away.
Characters that have been developed over many many pages are just terminated with all their associated plots just left hanging where there once could have been a good story.
This is a great concept but this guy is just trying to tell too much story and it looks to me that he was sick of writing it by book 4 and just wanted it done.
At the end of book 1 and book 2 you can't wait to read the next one.
Don't waste your time or your money.
David from USA Read through the 3rd book and going to stop.
While I enjoy the read, have the same complaints of over subplot development without any conclusions or wrap up.
There is no end, a good story should have beginning middle and end.
Other than killing off characters, no conclusions or endings.
After over 3000 pages no hope of an outcome.
Very disappointed because I was entranced by the first book.
After speaking to several friends who finished the series, they all told me to stop where I am.
Jani from Finland I can't really understand many of the reviews posted here.
The sex scenes I don't have a problem with.
It's not like they are great, but I don't get ticked off about them either.
The only complaint I agree with is the occasionally dull storyline Arya's chapters mostly but there are just more good chapters than bad.
But the thing I really don't get is the overwhelming complaining of G.
Martin killing the likeable characters.
I mean come on people!
I might be forgetting someone but not anyone special.
Remember, Catelyn DOES NOT die, Bran and Rickon don't die either, not Davos, not Tyrion, not Jaime, not Daenerys, not Brienne, not Arya and it also seems that the Hound is still alive, working with his sins as are gravedigger.
I am pretty sure that Jon doesn't die in book 5 either, just another Martin cliffhanger.
A lot of the unlikeable characters have died.
Joffrey, The Mountain, Balon Greyjoy and Theon is a spacecase.
I myself found the books great, but a rating of 9 is accurate because George is occasionly stretching the storyline through cliffhangers and dull chapters.
Frank from Cork The best fantasy series of all time in my opinion.
It's a complex plot that makes you work and even re-read the books to pick up the clues, but if you do then you will be rewarded.
It's not for everyone and if you want instant gratification, black and white good guys and bad guys, clean-cut dragon-slaying heroes, evil wizards, game free book of ra />If you're the type of idiot who skips whole chapters and still expects to get something from the book, then ASoIaF is most certainly not for you.
GRRM is a genius and this series is a brilliantly woven masterpiece.
That said, I'm not surprised by some of the negative comments, there will always be people who prefer the likes of 50Cent to Beethoven.
Matt Cole from Vancouver BC If writers are Gods — and they are — then George R.
Martin is Zeus, King of Gods.
Martin flawlessly weaves a tale of epic fantasy to launch, which is arguably the best fantasy series ever I know The Lord of The Rings and The Malazan Empire have their fans.
Tyrion, Sandor Clegane the HoundCersei, Arya, and Daenerys are particularly memorable.
This first installment is not heavily loaded with magic and the supernatural.
Other than the appearance of a supernatural race in the opening pages and again briefly later on, and the emergence of other mythological creatures in the closing pages, Game of Thrones is devoid of magic and the supernatural.
The conflict is among men and women, noble houses positioning themselves for the throne of a Kingdom.
The book is laden with political intrigue, conspiracy, ambition, and hidden family secrets.
Still, while the great houses maneuver for control of the throne, the reader is ever aware of a long dormant evil, that may rise to threaten the populace of the seven kingdoms.
As per the suggestion from other reviewers that this book is too explicit, I can say I have no idea where this is coming from.
I would not consider either the sex or violence in this book too explicit.
Certainly Steven Erikson and R.
Scott Bakker have gone farther in their series.
Roland from South Africa Man oh man, where do I start?
I was looking for another fantasy epic after reading Lord of the Rings and found the first book and I bought it, probably read the first 30 to 40 pages and I was so dissapointed!
I just stopped there.
Come on don't we have enough misery in the REAL world!
And really like some of the reviews said: a 48-year-old man writing about explicit deeds done to 13-year-old girls?
That is quite creepy and out of character for real fantasy.
If any prospective readers are reading this, please stop and don't make the same mistake I did: NOT READING THE READER REVIEWS!
It makes all the difference.
To sum it up: What a sad Song of Fire and Ice.
Barb from Wisconsin I took the time to read all 5 books in the series and when I got to the end of book number 5, I felt like it had been a big waste of time.
Within each book, Martin introduced countless characters, meandered off into numerous storylines and spent endless pages on descriptions and conversations that were of no story value.
By the end of book number 5 not one storyline came to a conclusion and I was left wondering what had happened to or would happen with all the characters that had been introduced.
Additionally, I felt like I had suffered through so much death, destruction, perversity and nasty sex scenes that not having anything conclude was especially disappointing.
Martin clearly got himself into a typing frenzy and forgot about how to really develop and tell a story.
If you choose to read all 5 books, prepare yourself for disappointment.
The Eragon series by Paolini who started writing his series in his early teens was better written than Game of Thrones and there is certainly no positive comparison to be made of Game of Thrones to J.
Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.
John from Ljubljana I have read the first three books and they are all fantastic to read; they involve everything a great fantasy book needs.
The series has an absurd amount of astonishingly realistic characters who couldn't be more different and yet at the same time they are all still the characters inhabiting this amazing fantasy world.
I fell in love with the Game of Thrones almost immediately, mainly because of unexpected turns and twists, that are not so common in this genre.
I highly recommend it to all fantasy fans out there.
Cat Fitzpatrick from London, UK I think a main reason why there is such a difference in opinion regarding this series is that the fantasy element is very small compared to the huge volume of story.
The main strength of A Song of Ice and Fire lies in the politics of a kingdom embroiled in a civil war where there isn't just two armies battling for the throne, there are up to seven various forces struggling to lay claim to either part or the whole of Westeros.
There are very good characters that come through - Tyrion Lannister for one is really interesting, and I really like the deviousness of Petyr Baelish - but as you go through the books the volume of characters increases, which can swamp the story in parts, and characters can vanish for quite a long time whilst the others are worked through.
The story can be quite slow and repetitive, and not enough time is spent to really build all of the main characters as well as they could be.
Sex is also overused with everybody at it like rabbits or raping their way up and down the length of Westeros.
However, some great set pieces are developed such as the use of wildfire in a river battle, and if you like epic stories this is richly detailed if maybe too over ambitious as to the amount of stuff crammed in.
It's worth a read, but takes a lot of investment of time to get to the good bits.
Jeffrey from Missouri First one is pretty good, but as others say, it goes downhill from there.
I am near the end of 3rd one, and what I keep thinking of is that this is just like the daytime soaps on TV.
It has turned into an endless series of twists and turns, where you can predict that just when one of the "good guys" just about get to a good place, some unlikely twist will prevent them from getting there.
The villians, when they lose, get banished, etc.
The sympathetic characters are all telegraphed simply by the names of the chapters.
The twists seem to be just for the sake of throwing in a twist to keep the story going, not to advance the plot towards a conclusion.
I will probably finish the series, because I have invested enough in knowing what happens, but as I read it I have this gut feeling like I am wasting my time.
Regarding the prose and characters.
I hear people praising the prose.
When I first started the book, I could not help but think of "A Conneticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court" by Mark Twain.
He does a wonderful send-up of the whole "knights in shining armor" style in that wonderful parody.
I give it a 4 because despite the many weaknesses I see, I AM still reading it, so something must be done right.
Tyler from US One of the most drawn out stories with so little grand gaming johannesburg and magic I've read.
Isn't the story I had hoped to read.
Sid This is easily the most overrated series in history.
It's not abysmal, mind you, but it's not great either.
The first couple of books are actually page-turners as Martin's style makes for very quick and fairly entertaining reads.
The attention is kept high through the use of plot-devices like cliffhangers, random character killing and equally random adult scenes.
Later on it develops into something more magic-oriented with undead and dragons.
Overall the plot is not that bad but it's terribly slow-paced and NOT original, especially in later books.
Some are well built at least in the initial "cast" but if the author really thinks his characters are realistic and "grey" he is deluding himself.
Most of them are flat and play the same stereotyped part throughout the entire series the first 5 books at least.
There are occasional side-changes but they're quite predictable and far from being mind-blowing.
Lots of important characters die in these books.
Because if you want to kill your characters you have to REPLACE them somehow.
GRRM apparently exausted his creativity in giving birth to the first "batch" of characters and every subsequent entry is even MORE dull, flat and utterly uninteresting.
Random, useless sex scenes every 50 pages or so?
At first it's somewhat entertaining but after 3 books you'll just say "Owww, again??!?!?!??
The level of detail can be painful at times.
Allow me to say it once more: the adult scenes in this series are useless, gratuitous and boring.
This is little more than a moneymaking franchise, decent at first but getting worse and worse with every installment.
There are A LOT of fantasy series much, much better than this.
David from Netherlands I've read a lot of Fantasy.
I guess this book was never meant purely for the Fantasy fans.
This book transvers from the individual FFans to the general public.
That in itself is a great achievemend.
I've read the books.
The massiveness about this story is good.
The multiple threads, the mulitple main characters.
It gives it a lot of credibility.
It is actually the strongest point of this project.
There's almost no speed to the pace of this story.
It goes on and on without much spectacular happening.
There are no really great crushing scenes that stay in my mind, where I can almost quote the whole LOTR trilogy by memory alone.
I must convess even though I've read the whole series twice to get in back in order after the long period of waiting for the next book I still cant remember a lot of it.
If you want a real great, slightly faster paced story with at least things happening and some things able to linger I would advice Robert Jordan.
Andreas from Sweden Have to say that this must be one of the most overestimated books ever.
He can write a whole chapter without shit happening.
I have read to the middle of book 4 and I have to say, he kills of every single character that's interesting.
Or he stops telling the story about them.
First book starts of good.
But from when Ed dies its just downhill.
I don't get ppl that says that amazing is and to low.
You need to read more books, some good books.
I don't want to finish the books but I feel that I have to, too much invested now.
Thank god that I didnt pay for free books />I would like to talk to George Martin and ask him just how the fuck he thought when he wrote this.
On the plus side, I enjoyed the story-telling.
But got bored of the endless descriptions of armour by the end.
This is written to be a best seller - nice and easy to read, without much depth.
It lacks literary merit, the language is poor and the descriptions not particularly evocative.
The real silliness seems to be his lack of imagination: The map of Westeros is an enlarged Britain, with the capital roughly where London is, and a big wall for Hadrian's wall.
North of the wall are savages poor Scots and there are vestiges of the indigenous Celtic religion in the wild woods.
The 'civilized' have the conqueror's Christian religion of course but it doesn't seem as exciting - surprise, surprise.
Barbarian hordes with their own savage ways threaten from across the continent, and the main action consists of conflict between the House of Stark York and Lannister Lancaster.
I did like the idea of a really long Summer and Winter though, presumably this comes into more play in about 10,000 pages time.
Some people seem to think the book's greatness lies in its 'grittiness' or its muddying of good and evil.
Yet, throughout the book there is really no doubt which side is good and which is evil.
And although he supposedly told the story from different perspectives, there was little change of voice - a missed opportunity.
So, I guess, yes, it's like Tolkien,but without his depth, language or imagination.
Will from USA I read this book and its sequel, but could go no further.
I feel like Martin's method of telling the story from each character's perspective click the following article interesting, but ultimately seemed to compel him to write ridiculously long chapters about characters that are of very little interest.
The amount of explicit content thrown into the novel is absolutely excessive, weighing down the novel with a layer of filth that in no way progress the story.
As other reviewers have mentioned, I have no problem with this content being included, but it quickly losses the little shock value it had, and does nothing to progress the novel.
The different elements contained in the book are split by region.
In the south, politics, wars, and other such evils of man occur.
The "evil" generally wins out and personally, I grew quite tired by the lack of anything good.
In the north there is an ominous wall, which is supposed to hold out all the real bad guys.
Martin generated a large interest in me for this region, despite it being a bland place of over done evils: zombies, shape shifters.
This region is where the magic seems to lay, but a minimal amount is seen.
There is also the region where the dragon queen lives.
I do not know her name.
I do not know what she has been doing.
All I know is that after two books and what felt like an endless amount of chapters dedicated to her, and she has managed to acquire three boats.
Ultimately, this separation serves to make the reader more inclined to read only certain character's chapters.
Regions are made to seem so distant as they have had minimal if any interaction makes it seem like it would be better to split the books by region.
The characters you don't connect with you will not read.
And you probably will not connect many characters, and the ones you do connect with just die.
These sudden deaths get approval from others claiming how shocking and "gutsy" it was to do such a thing.
The reality is that the author kills them off in such a manner that the reader is left wondering.
Why did the Character die?
A rarely answered question Do I care that this character died?
Most characters named upon death are some distant cousin to some character you read about through someone else's perspective 125 pages earlier.
Did the character really just die?
Turns out, the author lies to you, saying certain characters have died, and bringing them back to life later.
Killing characters off was something I once did in high school writing assignments to be done with said character.
I got a similar impression that this was Martin's use as well.
Characters themselves get varied levels of treatment to development.
Most of them did not make it past infancy, or after two books are still stuck in that.
I will not be reading thousands of pages to figure out what could have been put into two books.
There is no real conclusion after this book and the sequel.
I no longer care about the conclusion.
I did not know the HBO series existed upon reading this, and still have not watched it.
If you thought Eragon was a poor fantasy novel, then you're end for a prompt demand to re-appraise your rating of it.
The frustration I went through reading A Game of Thrones were tremendous.
Normally, I enjoy fantasy good and bad a great deal.
The worlds may have been strange in some cases, but imaginative.
A Game of Thrones fell short of every positive thing I had heard said about it.
Except I suppose the cover art was pretty good.
Andrew from Canada I haven't read the book, just commenting on the COMMENTS.
People who don't like it: they find it too explicit and lacking in coherent story telling plot lines.
People who like it: love the explicit content and just want others to like it too, without much else reason.
Based on that I don't think I'll get it.
James from Philadelphia This is one of my favorite series of all time.
Being able to understand so many different characters' perspectives on the books' events makes the series an extremely interesting read.
Books 1-3 are absolutely brilliant.
I am eagerly awaiting the final two installments and I hope they can live up to the promise that the series has shown up till now.
Big from Daz As with many of the above I came to these books via the HBO series which I thought was excellent, I am now on book 5 and starting to feel like the whole thing is being padded out to make someone extra 'coin '.
Most of the story and main characters either died or came to an end by book 4, as someone above said I really get the feeling Martin is bored himself, or planned to bring it all to an end around this point.
The bit with Ayra going backwards and forwards in the book was made so much better in the mini series they cut it out!
The sex scenes are too much, Martin has a worrying sexual fantassy with Dany a very young girl in the book, touching herself, exploring her sexuality, was it neccesary?
I was surprised at the age of many of his characters in the books, presumed they would grow over the course but then he kills them?
The mini series cuts out a lot of the fantasy stuff, seems to be staying away from the warg thing, green dreams, giants etc certainly not spending the time on it that Martin does and it's so much better for it.
Here's hoping the tv series keeps this to a minimum and maybe doesn't kill off Rob!
When it comes to rating I am marking down on the basis that one book I've just read part one of two started and ended having gone absolutley nowhere.
I get the feeling he wanted to end the whole thing around book 4, still going to stick it out to the end but don't expect to be able to make any character attachments.
Rupert from England Have just finished book 5 - is there a book 6?
Lots of stories left unanswered.
What happens to Bran, or Arya, the Wall, the Free People, Denares, the dragons, Stannis?
Richard from Washington, DC Martin seems to think that incessant scenes of rape, murder and incest equal "adult".
He fails to realize that this is just pandering to the lowest common denominator.
We get it, it's a hard old world!
Somewhere in all the thousands of pages, where he tells you what everyone is wearing and what every knight's heraldry looks like, there may be a good story.
But after three books I couldn't find it and have given up.
His prose is plodding, and using characters' full names all the time is annoying at best, as it feels like filler and ruins any rythym he might have had.
Almost all the characters are unlikeable and he seems to think killing any character that might be worth rooting for makes him "edgy".
Sorry, it just makes him lazy.
You just get the feeling he doesn't know where to go with these characters, and so he kills them off.
Besides, keeping them around might mean he would have to resolve storylines instead of keeping the money machine going with new characters and even more pointless storylines that he can end two books down the line when he runs out of idead for them.
And enough with the incest!
I wonder about him, if he can't think of any way of showing sexual relationships besides rape and incest.
He's not writing an epic fantasy series.
He's wrinting a porn soap opera.
Tonya from Paterson The reason most of us read is to escape the sometimes harsh reality of life.
In Games of Thrones I couldn't put the first book down, however I soon realized that evil was prevailing far too often.
There isn't enough relief for the good guys.
As an audience you need comedy, love and laughter just as much as tragedy and pain - there is an inbalance to these stories and killing off damn near ever underdog was just plain wrong.
I was totally disappointed.
Pat from Boston, MA It starts out meeting a family that you immediately like and generally root for, some more then others but overall good start.
I thought some pages or hundreds could be edited out but because the story was so strong and the characters so good I wasn't upset reading page after page.
I was wishing I could read faster most times but by book 3-4 the story goes stale for me.
I thought killing off the "good guy" and leader of the story was awesome.
In a way I hate this book, it sucks, but then seeing the great changes smaller characters make to combat his death make you fall in love with Robb Stark, Arya, Jon Snow and even Jamie Lannister.
But after the "Red Wedding" the book to me became stupid, "bad guys" get 2nd 3rd and 4th chances while people you care about are killed off without hesitation or meaning.
Theon, Jamie, Cersie, Varys, Baelish and even the Vlegane brothers are never killed off like Ned or Rob https://filmman.ru/book/new-games-samsung-z1.html now maybe Jon.
I feel like Martin backed himself into a corner as people and agree with the statement that he's grown bored with this story.
Well, why do you think that?
Please get the story back on track and have a Stark win.
My rating now is a 5, after book 2 it was a 9 or 10.
Erik from Ohio The first three books are great.
They held my attention throughout with lots of different things happening in the same time period due to the variety of characters.
I like the setup of writing chapters about certain characters, and it's even more exciting when one character's fate brings them alongside another main character in the same chapter.
I wish GRRM would have kept the Starks intact with their direwolves completing the immensely strong family, but it's not all happy endings in life either.
Dave from Maryland Got through part of the fourth book and quit.
Seriously, WTF is up with killing off or drastically screwing up the life of every character you get attached to?
I thought killing off Ned was cutting edge and suprising.
Evil seems to always win, and that just gets old.
A good thing once in a while would have kept me hopeful.
If I want to see reality of human behavior, I can watch the news; the hope with a book is to escape to a better place.
This series becomes a hell instead.
Captain Frogbert from New York I read the first book of this series and was thoroughly pleased to see the back of it.
Martin is, at best, a mediocre writer; a comparison to Michael Crichton would not be inappropriate: Plodding, trite, calculated, repetitive.
Add to that his clumsy attempts to invent language by misspelling common words and you have the worst sort of middlebrow hackery.
Oh, yes, calling a knight 'Ser' instead of Sir, really makes me feel like I'm in another world.
And Maester does the same thing.
One of his common "creative" threads is to make things BIGGER.
https://filmman.ru/book/how-to-book-slot-for-gre-exam.html "Eyrie" isn't just a tall tower like Barad Dur or Orthanc, it's a really, really, really tall tower like Barad Dur or Orthanc only TALLER — see how subtly better it is?
As for the world he has "created," well, his Dothraki are just yet another take on the Mongols can you say Horseclans or the Dalrei of Guy Gavriel Kay's Fionavar Tapestry?
The rest of the world is even worse, a pale pastiche of dark ages Europe via a worn carbon copy of J.
Off the top of my head, I can name you a dozen or more fantasy worlds with more depth and variety.
As for his characters, what a stifling band of dull, predictable, stick figures poorly disguised as plot devices or was it the other way around?
He tromps through his life growling and bemoaning his fate, never suspecting that the people EVERYONE ELSE KNOWS are the bad guys are going to do him in by lying, a concept he apparently cannot bring himself to understand, much less guard against.
Then he gets tossed in prison and, eleventy-twelve pages of other stuff happening later, comes out and recants his entire life and is killed.
Applause, applause all around.
Ooooh, what daring, killing off the main character like that.
Of course we never see his captivity or torture.
We never learn WHY he recants and loses his honor, we are simply left to presume that he was broken.
His death has no meaning because its entire reason for happening is so casually tossed away.
Oh well, off to the next whore house for him!
The rest of the characters are just as bad, little more than scrapings from the bottom of the central casting barrel.
The fat King Henry VIII via Falstaffthe evil queen how original!
This novel is soooo bad!
Game of Thrones is a lousy story, set in a boring world, written by a man who has no understanding of plot, pacing, story or character arc, or anything else a good writer understand.
And who is, apparently, utterly lacking in the basic ability to edit his work or simply to please!
Avoid this novel if you possibly can.
Modesto from New York This is a great adult fantasy series.
This story is not for everyone.
Especially for people who like sexy elves and tough dwarfs.
Not for those who seek instant gratification.
This is fantasy, a whole new fantasy, an adult fantasy.
I love how people are mad that certain characters are killed off but yet they bash the book, if you were not hooked and attached to the character you wouldn't care someone got knocked off.
This story is fantasy, thriller, exotic and poetic, you can argue it's real, if Westeros existed and Dothraki.
That is how people would have lived, killed and ventured.
It would be A Song of Ice and Fire!
Nancy from Honolulu First two books were gripping.
I am halfway into the third book and am finding it hard going, and I am a forgiving reader.
Far too many subplots going on with too many unsympathetic characters without a central unifying concept.
I will slog through, but I am finding myself taking digressions to read entirely different books, just to get a break.
This is a big change, as I read through the first two books over a long weekend - completely enthralled.
Kyle from Vancouver It's funny reading through all the reviews, the majority of tens come from people who've read only book 1, or book 1 and 2.
Those were great books, great character development.
But as many people here point out, as the series phrase slot booking for learning license ap remarkable on, GRRM's reticence to conclude a single damn subplot much less a plotline, while opting instead to introduce endless new characters dilutes the overall narative as he is no longer able to do any one storyline or character justice.
The new characters don't get much development at all.
It's a shaggy dog story.
I'd give 8 or 9 stars to the first 2 books - but the series over all I'd say 4.
He's totally wandered off and does not seem likely to return, so I shall do the same.
Now, I'm going to go see what this Steve Erikson everyone mentions is all about.
George from Toronto This story is the best ever written in any genre, period.
The first book is a wonder, the second is as good, and the third is best in the series.
I agree, the fourth and fifth aren't my favourites.
But they're still above-average.
I can't wait to see how the story concludes -- Martin is planning a total source 7 books.
I read some of the negative reviews.
The ones who are negative put right in their review that they skipped chapters.
Martin is a genius story teller, he didn't write 1,000 pages for his health.
It was for a purpose.
If you skip a chapter, how on earth can you complain if the rest of the story stops making sense?
The man is a God.
I read Erikson, Tolkien, Rothfuss, Hemmingway, and also crap like the Hunger Games.
Martin's story is 1 by a significant margin.
Hanna from USA I am not a book "reviewer" however, I was drawn into this series after I article source the HBO mini series "A Game of Thrones".
I read through the first 3 books anticipating what all the ground work Martin has laid to mean.
I can't finish it!
Nothing has come from the ground work that was laid in the first 3 books.
Main charaters are killed off for no apparent reason.
I feel like I am reading in circles and nothing is being resolved and nothing meant anything in the first 3 books.

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The series is all about power -- who wants it and how they get it.
Themes of family, faith, and loyalty run throughout, as do moral ambiguity and rampant betrayal.
Some women are empowered; others are not.
People of color are typically depicted as barbaric or animalistic or as slaves.
Frequent graphic, gory violence, including executions and their bloody aftermath, and large-scale battles with powerful and gruesome fight scenes.
Swords, crossbows, clubs, and any number of other weapons visible.
Sexual violence also the rating game book graphically depicted.
Skeletons, zombie-like creatures, and dragons are among the show's scary fantasy creatures.
Extensive male and female nudity; sex is graphically portrayed.
Adultery, prostitution, consensual incest between adults, and sexual bargaining are themes.
Pipe smoking https://filmman.ru/book/book-of-ra-game-slot-machine-free.html visible; characters are frequently depicted drinking excessively and sometimes behaving books reilly free o, irresponsibly, or violently as a result.
Drugs the rating game book used to poison people.
Parents need to know that Game the rating game book Thrones based on the is big-budget fantasy series that frequently depicts brutal battles and graphic, detailed acts of violence including those against children and womenas well as lots of nudity and no-holds-barred sexuality.
The latter is portrayed in an especially iffy manner, with explicit discussion and depiction of incest, adultery, and rape.
Strong language, including "f--k," is frequent.
Although the series is well produced, even the most sympathetic characters make plenty of iffy choices, and the over-the-top content is questionable for all but adult viewers.
The sex in the movie is sometimes the rating game book />There is gay sex, lesbian sex, incestual sex, and violent sex.
Not appropriate in some scenes even for adults.
First of all, I'm pretty shocked to see how many kids and parents who have watched with their kids have reviewed this show.
Let's be clear: It is no.
Alright- so, being a senior in high school, one could imagine that I have heard at least once well- in my case at least 8 times someone tell me: "Watch G.
The show has a lot of sex in season 1, Less in 2, and very little in 3.
Think about your kids maturity not their age.
If you know your kid is fine with swarming.
Adapted from the popular series of fantasy novels by George R.
Martin, GAME OF THRONES is set in the fictional medieval kingdom of Westeros and follows a large cast of intertwined characters through political intrigue, emotional drama, and fierce battles.
Lord Eddard Stark begins as the show's central figure, acting as chief adviser for his boyhood friend King Robert.
Stark must act as protector and patriarch of his family and the throne itself as threats emerge from both distant lands and nearby traitors.
As the series progresses, betrayals large and small change the political landscape of Westeros irreversibly, leading to ever more complicated the rating game book and plot twists -- not to mention brutal battles and struggles for survival.
As with most HBO series, Game of Thrones benefits greatly from the budget and talent poured into its execution.
This is an artful series; the script is intelligently written, the show is well-acted, and the direction and cinematography are easily on par with any Oscar-nominated film.
It's easy to get drawn into the machinations of Westeros; the show is compulsive viewing.
All that said, there are moments of brutal violence and sexuality that might pull viewers who aren't ready for them out of the narrative.
Certainly Westeros is a dark world inhabited by some very disturbing characters, but the violence is at times lingered upon in a very unsettling way.
Although these moments may be mitigated by later plot developments, that doesn't change their impact as they happen.
For viewers who can tolerate these incidents, the merits of the series the rating game book win out, but it won't be for everyone.
Is the sex depicted in Game of Thrones appropriate for the story?
What messages do viewers take away about sex from watching this series?
Is it too graphic?
Why, or why not?
What about people of color?
Where do they fit in?
About these links Common Sense Media, a nonprofit organization, earns a small affiliate fee from Amazon or iTunes when you use our links to make a purchase.
Thank you for your support.
Our ratings the rating game book based on child development best practices.
We display the rating game book minimum age for which content is developmentally appropriate.
The star rating reflects overall quality and learning potential.
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As warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert bestows on him the office of the Hand.
His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must.
The old gods have no power in the south, Stark's family is split and there is treachery at court.
Worse, a vengeance mad boy has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities beyong the sea.
Heir of the mad Dragon King deposed by Robert, he claims the Iron Throne.
Ever just click for source my entry into the heady and wonderful peaks of fantasy literature following the release of the Fellowship of the Ring movie in 2001, I have been hard pressed to find an author greater than the inimitable J.
But both authors have fallen short of the sheer scope that Tolkien envisioned and, successfully, created.
Since then, I have only come across two authors who have come close to envisioning and successfully carrying out their literary creations to match Tolkien; Steven Erikson and George R.
Some authors try, and fail miserably.
For Martin though, in scope, creativity, and writing ability, A Song of Ice and Fire is everything you want in an epic fantasy tale.
Set in a world very akin to our own medieval history, specifically the English War of the Roses, A Game of Thrones introduces us to one of the greatest and largest character lists around.
The story is told from eight perspectives.
Each perspective is held within a chapter which, when the characters move away from each other, allows the author to continually leave minor cliff-hangers at the end of each chapter.
While six of the characters click the following article this first book are from the same family, the perspective is shifted around in preceding books.
Death is commonplace, almost to the point of horror, but conducted in such a way that it, sadly, reminds us of our own bloody histories.
Martin does not shy away from the death, rape and plunder that would have been norm for the setting and in doing so provides a much more complete story.
Mindless destruction is often the cause for character splits and confrontations, and by the end of the book characters you assumed you would be attached too for some time are left headless, gutless or simply gone.
Throughout the entire series Martin focuses almost primarily upon one continent.
However there is one character, Daenerys Targaryen, who has been forced to flee to a separate continent as a young girl.
At first I remember feeling disorientated and a little slighted at seemingly being provided this perspective which seemed nothing short of pointless.
However as I have continued to read, she has become one of my favourite characters.
Dense to the point of labour, but captivating well past my bed time, Martin knows exactly where to draw the line between lots of information and tedious boredom.
Joshua S Hill The novel, A Game of Thrones, begins with an encounter with supernatural beings; this may give a false impression as to what will come.
As the story begins to unfold, the theme moves strongly into the area of political intrigue and this forthcoming war that will happen as a result.
The fantasy element, while always there plays only a minor role in the majority of the rest of the book.
A Game of Thrones in not your usual fare, it is hard-hitting and bad things do happen to the good people.
Two families take centre stage in a battle for the Throne; the Starks and the Lannisters.
The Stark family live in the cold hard North, Winterfell is the seat of their domain.
We are, using https://filmman.ru/book/www-games-book-com.html headlined with the family names, introduced to the Stark family.
King Robert is married to a Lannister, Queen Cersei.
He is accompanied there by Tyrion Lannister, a dwarf.
Although they do not become friends they end up with a grudging respect for each other.
Then, suddenly one day, the King is killed hunting wild boar and Eddard and the Lannister are drawn into a battle for the throne.
Finally, at the end, the fantasy element once again returns and we are left looking forward to the second instalment.
This is a very good novel, full of twists and turns.
It leaves you wanting more and move on to A Clash of Kings.
It's ambition: to construct the Twelve Caesars of fantasy fiction, with characters so venemous they could eat the Borgais.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 1 9.
Winter can last a lifetime.
And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.
As Warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robe.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 2 9.
From the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding lands of Winterfell, chaos reigns as pretenders to the Iron T.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 3 9.
The Seven Kingdoms are divided by revolt and blood feud as winter approaches like an angry beast.
In the northern wastes a horde of hungry, sav.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 3 9.
Robb Stark may be King in the North, but he must bend to the will of the old tyrant Walder Frey if he is to hold his crown.
And while his youngest.
A Song of Ice https://filmman.ru/book/how-to-book-a-slot-for-passport-at-vijayawada.html Fire: Book 4 7.
The war in the Seven Kingdoms has burned itself out, but in its bitter aftermath new conflicts spark to life.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 5 8.
In the east, Daener.
Have you read A Game Of Thrones?
We've found that while readers like to know what we think of a book they find additional reader reviews a massive help in deciding if it is the right book for them.
So if you have a spare moment, please tell us your thoughts by writing a reader's review.
Eric from America This is a great book.
I enjoy the brutal realism of the characters and the world that Martin has built.
McIntosh from USA How are they considering Game of Thrones high fantasy?
It seems like the perfect example for low fantasy to me.
Most of the show revolves around politics and wars, and magic isn't a normal part of everyday life.
Brecken from USA There are no books I love more than the A Song of Ice and Fire.
Honestly, it deserves so much better than a 9.
I almost exclusively read fantasy and these books are as good as lord of the rings, in a different way a very different way.
The best thing is they are all about character.
In fantasy, characterization is often put to the side so that cool battles and fun magic can be explored more.
There are only two characters in the entire series that I know are the bad guys, and the author even has me feeling bad for them at some points.
Every character feels real, and there are moments where I have hated every one of them, and moments where I have loved them.
They all develop over time in ways that you can barely notice until it hits you that, wow, that character isn't evil anymore.
There are a million plot lines, and each one is very real.
No one cheats, no one can "just do the magic thing" to get out of a situation.
Our favorite characters die, and the bad ones get to live.
It is extremely well written, fast paced in some places and slow in others.
The books have a depth that make you want to read the series over and over again so you can find out just what is going on with the characters, and catch all of the hints and symbolism the author puts in there.
I will never look at fantasy the same again, this series has changed my world view.
Mike from Canada The first book was very entertaining and Ned's death was actually shocking.
I sat there thinking about all that could come from this series.
Yeah some of the writing was ham fisted, who am I to judge, but the plot was like one of those Rockwood Gardnes trees with plums, peaches, cherries and apples all on the same tree.
Lots of low hanging fruit to pick from.
Hey we got these giant hybrid wolves, maybe shapeshifters, telepathy, dragons, ghasts, magic, assassins, and lots more.
Yes there are barbarians in the north and its cliche, but that can work.
Political intrigue of england.
And we have somewhat good and bad guys.
Great start aaaaand then the wheels fall off.
Instead of using some of the fruit he just letting fall off the tree to rot.
Instead we are given lists of crap we don't need to care about.
What type of fowl they are eating, the sauce, where the sauce is from, where the fowl is from, who is eating it.
OH yeah this 3rd Bannerman for the house of Mooreevilish is wearing a turquoise tunic fashioned from the twill of far off Neargoodshire where small puppies are strung up and hit like pinatas but makes them less evil than their neighbour who does it with live babies in Babybashinworth, though Babybashingworth is known for their exquisite soup made from infant brains served in a fusia bowl decorated in intricate gold filigree and a soup spoon fashioned from the eyesocket of the dogs in Neargoodshire, painted a vermillion redly.
See what happens when you aren't concise.
You will never see that bannerman again, the meal has no plot meaning, nore does the origin of the tunic if it doesn't have any consequence later on.
Scene one shotgun on mantle, better use that things sometime during your performance or it shouldn't be there.
A good editor would have made this a lot better.
By book 3 I was still waiting on things I knew where not coming.
I gave up in book 4 because I had done 8 books of Jordan and decided to never waste my time on a series that just sits around.
Yes he kills characters, but it becomes trivial when it happens so often.
Yes and this is novel where you are suppose to bond with characters, not feel like some lofty king who rolls over a beggar in your grand caravan.
Little growth that is meaningful because that character will of course die, plot that just seems to go in a circle, prose that aren't good.
Yes 1 star is harsh, but jebus this could have been so much better.
Book one left enough there to make 5 good series and he couldn't make one in the 5000 pages written so far.
Kath from England Takes a while to read and some parts are slow but the storyline is amazing and I highly recommend.
Poppia from China I have to say, I wonder, how you people could even get through the first page.
I had to read it, because everybody was recommending it.
It's all because of the language.
Seriously, how could people even suffer it?!
What the fuck is "Will had known that they will drag him into the quarrel sooner or later, and he wished it would have been later rather than sooner"???
And what the fuck is "slender as a knife"???
And what the fuck is "he studied that deepening twilight in that half-bored, half-distracted way he had"???
I know popular books are supposed to be easy to read, but this?!
Even grade school kids write way much better, and coherent.
Despite really wanting to read it because I want to find out what is going on and what everybody is talking about in this serieI can't read it, I just can't.
I have no idea why this ever got published.
So, i don't recommend you to read it.
It ruins your linguistic skills.
And it ruins your abilities to write and even talk normally.
Corin from United Kingdom This series is very simplistic for fantasy.
The world is empty, no magic systemno real variation between factions or originality.
Characters all behave the books dvds games and way.
No explanation or balance which amount to childlike world building.
Where are the normal people, they're all Lords or Knights.
The battles are ridiculous, far too many deaths, no tactics and no war machines of any sort.
Really, what are the chances of Gilly not getting raped at Castle black, slim to none.
Sam would've been raped!
Put a woman in maximum security prison and see what happens.
Violent and miserable does not equal realistic!
TV series is brilliant but not a fair representation of the books.
Donald from US The first three books I would give a "7".
Books 4 and 5 get a 2.
The first three books were page turners, though still flawed.
As others have said, his realism sheds over into sadism at times.
And then there is the overuse of phony cliffhangers-- for instance, we are told Arya is hit on the head by an ax swung by a man on horseback and many pages later we find it was only the flat of the ax and so she survived.
Highly unlikely, but aside from that, cheap storytelling.
The TV series has some of the same flaws, but improves on the books by removing some of these idiotic cliffhangers.
And the characters are frankly more human.
Shae, for instance, is a cliched " bad" prostitute in the books.
She is a real human being in the show.
Despite their flaws, the first three books were real page turners for me.
Books 4 and 5 were mostly dreary.
Many of the most interesting characters, good and bad and yes, the distinction is clear have been killed off, only to be replaced by new characters who are simply not that engaging.
Seasons 5 and 6 on TV have been justly criticized, but there are at least some truly exciting episodes and some moderately entertaining dialogue even in the slower episodes.
I have rewatched them all.
I have zero interest in ever rereading Martin's books, because the last two have been so bad.
I don't really care if he ever finishes the series.
For me, the TV series, flawed as it is, is the real story as far as I am concerned.
Martin created an immensely fascinating world, but he badly needed an editor who could stand up to him.
Gabriele from Italy Overated books.
Childish and false "European middle age" from low quality school books.
A Must NOT Read.
Worst is the fans, they say that Lord of the Rings is for kids, REALLY?!
This book wad've been good if it divint' have the sex!!!
Lawrence von Kyleman from Prussia HBO show is far superior to the books simply because it seems as though Martin always intended for his series to be made into a visual form.
How else do you explain the long drawn out descriptions of small inconsequential bull which is so frequently used.
I can't imagine how the narrators for the audio-books could keep themselves from falling asleep.
I bet editing and adapting this drivel for TV must be a pain though.
I imagine the writers pouring over the books cutting out the descriptions of stupid crud, useless subplots, and fixing this fat dbags see more bland and plot-hole ridden narrative.
I'd geuss they use about 40% of the source material in the show after that.
I think HBO did an amazing job with this show, and I wish they came up with it themselves so they didn't have to pay some lazy, fat, old man to go through his thousands of pages worth of vapid, drawn-out, poorly executed, novels laden with what I can only assume are his sexual fantasies.
Sundar from Lal This book, and the other books published of the series, are as impressive and amazing piece of literature.
The characters in the story are superb.
I read these book and absolutely had to recommend them to every book buddy.
Decimus from Canada Some people believe that it is justifiable write reviews for the entire series on the page for the first book.
I personally find it interesting, as though many people decided that they would attempt to warn others of the series inevitable decline in the reviews of the first book.
I would have to agree with this line of thinking sadly enough as, like many others I ariel book maker game that the series is excellent at first with many strong points to be found in the first few books, however the strength of the plot wanes once the fourth book starts, and the quality of the books becomes more diluted once the fifth is reached.
The series can still be saved, but with no release date as of yet for the sixth book, with the seventh and final volume most likely being another five to six years after.
The more dedicated fans will be forced learn more here wait in quiet agony hoping Martin does not pass away before the ending is finished.
As far as the problems I have with the books, I will try to keep them short and simple for the purpose of the review.
First, the people who we are supposed to sympathize with Starks are all morons.
Eddard is a moron for announcing his intentions to Cersei, Robb and Catelyn are morons for siding with Renly over Stannis the rightful king and going to the home of a man known to break oaths.
Finally, the use of Deus ex Machina, its everywhere.
In short I like the books enough for what they are but the issues I have with the characters and inclusion of poorly written Deus ex Machina story coincidences is too great to ignore.
Bruno from Brazil I would just like to say that I really wanted to like this book.
I read about 500 pages and the story moves forward at such a slow pace that I couldn't bother reading further.
Every event feels like an obvious plot device, there is no culture, characters have no personality and no charisma whatsoever, there are too many storylines happening at the same time and none of them are in the least interesting, because the novel is structured in a way that when you start developing the slightest bit of sympathy towards a certain character the author ends the chapter, and the next chapter focuses on a completely different story arc with a different set of characters, much like the scenes in a soap opera.
There's no fantasy in this first volume of GoT except for dragon eggs, zombies, and swords with hilarious names.
Don't waste your time on this.
Peter from Netherlands Perhaps the literary con-job of the century.
Mediocre unoriginal writing that sets up a myriad of random story lines and finishes none.
Many people mistake this lazy haphazardly way of writing with the world being rich and the characters realistic, but is simply is a cheap trick invoked by a writer who probably has no idea how he's going to wrap everything up properly, not that this is a problem for him in the future.
I find it amazing how this parlor trick convinced so many people to run with this drivel, but that's the internet age for you.
Perhaps that is why he dislikes fanfic so much, knowing that his pulp isn't that far above the average slash nonsense.
If you want mindless entertainment, see the show and read a good book, not this MacDonalds fantasy wannabe.
Jarek from Usa I would like to start by saying that the fanboys ruined the series for me.
You know who I am talking about.
The people who belive that the books are absolutely perfect and the author is a god among men who we shall bow down to.
As for the books, I find that they start off fine, but somewhere down the line I believe that Martin has too much to focus on due to multiple characters and storylines needing to be written across varied locations spanning continents.
There really is too much to focus on for any writer, but then add in the obsessive amount of detail and its no wonder the books lose quality as they go on.
I believe what Martin should have done is kept things simple, one characters point of view and get straight into winter rather than letting the main issue wait for 5 books at 1000+ pages per book.
It really is more like we got to a party too soon while the decorations are still being set up for the main event.
The books are mediocre at best, I believe that a vast majority of the people who claim to be fans of this series only read it because of the show and were sorely disapointed.
Mike from South Wales Maybe you have to be a certain type to enjoy this particular genre of book?
It certainly did nothing whatsoever for me.
I find that if the first ten pages or so do not grab my attention then that is it.
This was certainly the case with Game of Thrones.
Sorry but I just do not see the attraction.
It was the most boring, long drawn out 4 chapters that I have ever read in my life and I will not be attempting to read anymore of it.
Erik from Germany I have a few problems with these books, first is the borderline obsessive detail, the amount of detail GRRM puts into these books prohibits you from seeing the world as you want to see it and limits you to the author's view.
The main problem for me however, is the multiple characters I do not care about at all.
So far after 5 books, only three really interest me, Tyrion, Jon, and Daenerys.
I really do not care what happens to anyone else at all.
The rest of the Starks and Lannisters could kill each other off for all I care.
At this point I just read the chapters concerning those three and read summaries for everyone else.
Rebekah from New Zealand This thick, material crammed book is written so brilliantly that it is impossible for one to get bored whilst article source />I enjoy the fact that everyone is somehow connected in the story, no matter how far away they all seem from each other.
What additionally made this novel awesome was that at each end of chapters, GRRM would leave a cliff-hangar, forcing you to read on till it's 3:34 on a school morning.
Ron from Canada Reading this series has been just slowly watching anyone with any sort of morals die off.
It grows very tiresome very fast, at this point nothing could get me to continue reading what has become a series devoid of any characters I can sympathize with.
I'll read a synopsis when it ends just so I know how GRRM will finally kill this series.
Of course part of me also wishes GRRM will die before he finishes so the people who think this series is better than Tolkien's work will never get an ending.
Ewan from Scotland This book was the first book I finished on my own and not being forced English in school.
This book is so good that it made me, someone who would never even try a book.
Get into reading, you know it's good.
Toland from Scotland This is really the only series I will never bother to finish.
After reading through the first few books of this supposedly fantasy series I have to wonder where the fantasy is.
All I found was some bs about winter coming which wore down my patience so fast along with the overdone descriptions.
I believe at this point the success of the books more or less piggyback on the accesability of the tv show.
This is the only explanation I can find for the series success.
Victor from Canada I suppose that today's popularity of this book series comes directly from the HBO show.
The popularity of this TV show, on its part, comes from the realities that there are not many "medieval - fantasy" type of shows on today's television.
Therefore, when you don't have enough fish in the lake, every more or less decent crucian would be considered to be a local whale and a shark altogether.
The book is overrated.
The narration is flat and colorblind.
The monologues are emotionless and, for the most part, don't carry any story-progressing load on them.
The description of decorations, clothing and little details is pretty often redundant and used just to eat more pages that readers paid for, especially in the latest books.
Author uses his very first book to set up the chess pieces and intrigue the reader, but it is hard to distinguish when if the game actually starts, and while the reader is making his attempt to figure that out, some main characters are already dead, others have fallen away from the story line and don't play any part in it.
The only three stars I give are for the fist book, because initially it looked promising.
I don't know what percentage of HBO's profit goes into Martin's pocket, but the truth is, Martin should be the one who is paying HBO for forcing his luck of talent going mainstream.
Joe from USA I made it to only slightly more than halfway through Book 1.
It is the only novel I can ever remember not finishing.
Matteo from Italy Not really a novel, rather a soap opera screenplay for sex-dreaming male kids with a taste for the shallow and the boring.
Also, a very good business for the author.
Infesting, as parasite vines.
Avoid at all cost.
Alice from England I will give it just over half stars, purely because I think that the concept is brilliant, and the series begins very strongly, with the first book in particular being excellent.
However, sadly, what could have been an explosive series slowly dissolved into an anti climax with absolutely nothing happening.
Book one, and most of book two are very good, book three has some interesting parts, although admittantly it begins to loose structure, book four however, I struggled with despite flying through the preceding books and I gave up on book five.
It seems that the interesting characters that Martin established in the first book have either been killed off or their storylines have dried out and have subsequently been replaced with much less interesting characters and storylines.
All in all, the disappointment factor when reflecting upon what this story could have been is perhaps the worst thing about it.
It could have been great, and it has its moments, but when you look at the potential that Martin had to begin with, which slowly dissolves into nothing, it's just such a shame that he couldn't carry it out and that's the worst thing about the series, the dreadful waste of potential.
Still, I wouldn't say avoid it completely, just be aware that this story will probably not play out the way you had hoped and you may well find yourself as disappointed as I was.
Alex from Greece I absolutely loved it, the whole idea, the writting style.
I do not get why everyone disses that "Dance with Dragons" fifth book though.
I found it quite interesting.
Maria from US "Six" as a rating is deceptive.
I gave 10 to the first three books, and single stars to the last two books, and 6-7 is what I got.
Sadly, the last two books take all the momentum of the first three, and flush it down the toilet.
I'm waiting for book six, and hoping that Martin gets his act together, but at this point the story is so bloated that it's unlikely to happen.
If anyone wants an excellent series that moves like a well-oiled machine from start to finish, try Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy.
However gradually this 'epic' seems to loose all momentum and direction, it is when you begin to realize that there are entire chapters in the book that you do not care about, entire chapters that are so mind numbingly dull and uninsightful, that you could happily skip them.
Words become words, everything takes so long, too long to arrive at a destination.
The most interesting stories seem to end abruptly or with an inadequate solution and you begin to notice that the more words that are written the more the books loose all sense of direction, you become unattached from all characters and stories and its a shame because the world which has free audible books created is sublime, however the way in which this 'epic' is told just does not do justice to the first two books and the direction it was originally heading in.
Kate from UK Half way through book 5 ' A Dance with Dragons' and losing the will to live.
On the back of the TV series the first two books were enjoyable enough with sympathetic characters and some genuine boo hiss baddies to hate but by book 4 we were flagging and book 5 is simply dreadful.
Self indulgent repetitive and pointless.
Dany continues to play the stroppy teenager before finally getting laid having dumped her dragons in a pit on noticing they aren't house-trained.
Martin clearly doesn't care about his characters so how can we?
So utterly disdainful is he of his readers that he ends his books with a self pitying winge about what a bitch it all has been for him to write.
Well not nearly as big a bitch as it was to lay out good money then waste hours of our lives reading this self indulgent piffle mate.
Wayne from US Awesome book, enticing read.
Love the series and people complaining how it's poorly written.
This is really a great series, not a single one of you could even come close to matching Martin's writing.
Mamushet from Washington DC I would have to say that the world GRRM created is interesting.
But the series is over extended and loses its appeal after the first two books.
The fourth and fifth books are filled with repetitions and tedious details.
The book starts by building some anticipation for the arrival of winter yet you will have to read five books to get there.
It is like watching 15 min boring commercial for 2 min show.
Greblixx from Germany Avoid this mediocre book.
It's more than loss of time.
It's a nonsensical mess.
Book 4 and 5 have absolutely nothing to say and all the characters are primitive.
It seems that the author just wants to set a record of number of pages lacking of any substance.
Jayne from United States For a while, I've been trying to figure out how I feel about these books I've read all 5.
They're a deviation from the traditional fantasy storyline hero that overcomes all vs.
I do think he does it well, the story is well written and always keeps you guessing.
I didn't have a problem with the multiple characters and their separate chapters I made it through the Wheel of Time series and loved itbut I did have a problem with caring what happens.
I like that Mr.
Martin has no qualms about killing off whatever character needed to die and the revolving complexity of the plot is really interesting.
But honestly, what I think he lost between the multiple characters and their impermanence was making me care about the character.
I think he shows their negative sides much more than any goodness in them and in not knowing how long they're going to be around, I found myself avoiding getting too emotionally involved in their stories to the point that I just don't really care what happens to them anymore.
I also agree with another reviewer here in that somewhere the overall plot gets lost.
Also I'm just confused about the role of the whole "winter is coming" idea - I would like to see that come to more prominence because I could see that forcing everyone to set aside their differences and their petty politics to the rating game book a common foe - and it's seemed like that since the very first chapter.
Overall, I say kudos to Mr.
Martin for daring to break the traditional fantasy conventions and hopefully opening a whole new realm of possibilities for other writers but I hope that after this series, he learns from his mistakes and writes a much better one.
I give it 6 stars for boldness, creativity, interesting characters and good writing.
Nobody from USA Wow, you are comparing Martin to Tolkien?
If I could pick a fantasy author to recommend to someone looking for something to equal or best Tolkien's LoTR, it would have to be Gene Wolfe, and the Urth series.
Phil from US Book 1, good -- Book 2, OK --- Book 3, hoping something happens that doesn't waste Book 1.
Book 4, didn't finish, no ending could be worth the bother.
I've read "War and Peace", Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" twiceSelby Foote's "The Civil War", the Literary Digest's "History of the World War" WWI, all ten volumes ; I even took a crack at the Encyclopedia Britannica when I was 12 and home sick for a month.
I've read some part of a book every day for over 50 years, since I was able to read anything.
And never, ever have I abandon a book in mid-stream not even Joyce's "Ulysses" or even James' "The Golden Bowl", which, while brilliant are a slog for a modern reader.
It's bloated, filled with characters no one can care about, and too many points of view.
The only way to end this series is to kill off nearly everyone and since there are so many characters the reader can hardly care.
As Stalin is reputed to have said, "one death is a tragedy, a million deaths are a statistic.
Felix from America An absoloutely brilliant novel.
In my opinion, A Game of Thrones is one of the greatest fantasy novels ever written by one of the best authors ever.
George RR Martin is able to capture emotions and build suspense and leaves you wanting more.
A truly great novel.
Jake from Australia To all the haters, you're entitled to your opinion.
I like to recall the story of how the producers of the TV show read a part of the first book and were immediately overwhelmed, impressed, taken by the imagery, the ambience, the sense of place and the characters.
So, at least 2 people in the world were touched by the book.
Now that's 2 more than a lot of other writers.
Cristoff from Australia Too long winded, too much focus on tedious details.
The basic Premise for the novels is good in my opinion, But really needed to be written by someone like J.
Rowling who knows how to filter out Blab.
The second half of the third book is the most interesting to read while the whole fourth book made me want to scure my eye balls with a hot iron poker.
Yngvar from Norway I have been going through books 1-4 now, and I must say that I sometimes could not get off the book, it's exciting.
But many other times I really relent starting a new chapter, especially when I see that the chapter title is "Sansa" or "Catelyn".
There are way too much text in which nothing ever happens, nor the monolouge is interesting.
Worst of all is the vast number of too-long descriptions of what people are wearing!
Or how things look!
Got damnit, that's so uninteresting!
Anthony from UK To those who say the writing isn't good, I challenge you to write at Martin's level.
The different pespectives add depth to the story but I understand that some people might have trouble understanding.
I wish to note that in no mean I judge the series alltogether.
Martin have created an interesting world with lots of likeable charachters, epic story and unique in a sense playing with reader.
The problem I have is that it's boring.
No, not the story, however overdone and simple, but the narrative.
Never have I reade such flat descriptions and emotionless dialouge, not to mention forced expositions.
Honestlythe idea of charachter perspective told story with each chapter being presented from pov of different one involved in an event is nice, the execution is less than impressive.
If not for the HBO show I would have hard time getting into the presented world.
Another thing are all the Deus Ex Machina literaly forcing the plot to continue the intended way.
HBO patches some holes, adds here, takes away there and makes the story overall better and of course.
Puts life into the charachters and dialogue!
I hope the other books of the series are better because https://filmman.ru/book/australian-slot-machines-free-book-of-ra.html far my jaw hurts from yawning.
Darren from Manchester I can only really use two words to rate this book you can apply the same two words to the entire series to be truthful - Over Rated.
I have seen people rate this alongside Tolkien or Ursula Le Guin, Martin couldn't and doesn't hold a candle to those writers nor about 10 others whom are far superior.
Try reading the Mistborn Series Brandon Sanderson or Malazan Series Steven Erikson and then re-assess Martin, I will guarantee you opinion will have changed : Andrew from USA Game of Thorns is a good book, but it is intro to a bad series.
I have many gripes for the book but the biggest and most important one is the singular fault with Eddard Stark.
That being when he learns of what the Queen has done.
Eddard to this point in the book the whole book almost has done the "right thing" no matter how much it hurts himself, family, anyone.
At the finally moment when doing the "right thing" would mean justice for his family and protect his family, he doesn't do it.
Instead he makes an offer with the Queen instead of exposing her.
Martin had a good book and a good beginning to a series until that moment.
It went downhill from there, and really is just unreadable.
Gordon from Oklahoma, USA A Game of Thrones, and the rest of the Fire and Ice series, are the finest stories I have read in many years, and I am a prolific reader who enjoys many different categories of literature.
After having read Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy as well as the Hobbit a few years ago while the Peter Jackson movies were being progressively released, I am of the opinion that "A Game of Thrones" and the entire Fire and Ice click to see more to this point are several steps above anything Tolkien ever wrote.
An added bonus is the result of HBO is doing a great job of bringing the Fire and Ice books to the homes of people who would never consider picking up a 1000 page novel.
Anybody who bothers to read each of the books from both writers can count themselves lucky to be able to enjoy such well written literature.
For those who have seen the HBO series and enjoyed it so far, you should read A Game of Thrones and decide for yourself if the written material is superior to the theatrical release.
I would also put this series above the Harry Potter books and movies.
Emily from England Read it because of the series on television and am not ashamed.
It does include adult scenes, which I thought fitted the atmosphere of the novel and I am a teenager, so it is understandable I would find them more awkward.
You can't complain about not understanding the novel if you don't read all of it, including the 'boring' parts.
All the Tolkien lovers need to broaden their horizons.
GRRM isn't trying to be Tolkien, he's an epic writer on his own with his own style.
Kah from Brazil This is modernity, I guess.
The way of narrating a story has certainly changed.
Things are about discourse and action, now.
This is a great epic which is providing nice adaptations.
Of course, the plot spinia very long and, because of this, its quality oscilates sometimes.
I myself didn't like the fourth book the first three books were an amazing experience and the fifth has been little playful.
But this is not about comparing G.
M to Tolkien or Lewis.
This is about accepting what this generation is producing and understand it withouth making anacronisms.
Highfantasy from Pakistan I have few complaints: The books are filled with far too many subplots, characters and POVs.
I wonder why add them when Martin has to kill and burn everything, I found this practice to be rather masochistic, reminiscent of Peakes' Gormenghast trilogy.
How much detail is enough and how many time does he has to repeat them?
For instance Old Bear's Raven sitting on his shoulder and repeats last word of every sentence he says and he is awarded with corn, Ghost is warm, Bran is crippled, Catelyn is a women, Sansa is a complete fool, Davos has moving his finger less hand and Danerys deserves a slap.
I liked the story but it's way too long and tiresome to read, endless and repetitive details ruined it.
I cannot get past the third book.
Thomas from England I would like to point out that the book being reviewed is Game Of Thrones, not the whole series, A Song Of Ice And Fire, which many people seem to be forgetting.
M from USA Utter crap.
To compare this to Tolkien WHO CREATED THE MODERN FANTASY GENRE is inexcusable and ignorant.
Typical of most modern entertainment, it is nothing more than a writer's endless quest for cash and fame.
Sadly after 3 decades as a fan of the fantasy genre I have stopped reading fantasy novels as the genre like so many other things in this modern world have been cheapened and turned to crap.
To all those people who love reality TV.
Eric Showatt from Australia People seem to think the reason why the opinion about this series is so divided because the way the author kills off the character and the amount of angst, miseries this series content.
While this may seem like a plausible reason, the real reason is actually far more simple.
Game of Thrones sucks.
Now I'm not here to troll or bash the author - I'm here to review this series honestly.
There is no doubt in my mind that GRRM is one of the most prolific writer of our time.
His world building ability is on par with Tolkien, and the character he has created are very realistic and interesting.
One can almost read Game of throne like an alternative history if we forget all the magical element within the story.
The political motivation the rating game book each character are very well defined and the consequences for failure in this series are heavy - you are lucky if you managed to die a clean death, as is the case with Ned Stark.
He died, sure, but click at this page are many character who ended up wishing they were dead but couldn't quite manage it because their tormentors prevent them from doing so.
There is beauty in this book.
Beauty in the finality of death and the cruelty of living.
I would like to ask every reviewer and every reader of Game of Thrones, what is the actual plot of this series?
Lots of things happen, sure.
You get loads and loads of characters.
Each of them have their own arc.
Some gets killed off, some don't, but are any of them truly relevant?
Just consider this for a second and you will see what an appalling story the series is - it's not actually a story.
It's many story woven into one book, like a game that contains several character sheet and no main plot whatsoever.
Things unfold, but it's just things that happens.
If I were to describe what this story is about, I would simply say "It's a book about a bunch of things that happened in a land called Westeros", and that's pretty much what the series has become by the end of the third book.
Now I will go on to say that the first book is simply breath taking.
There is actually a plot, and the characters pov are consistent and - most importantly - relevant.
You get the honorable idiot Ned Stark who is trying to figure out why Jon Arryn was killed, while his wife and kids are trying to figure out who pushed Bran off the balcony.
The two conspiracies tied together, because what Bran witnessed was the key to Ned Stark's hunt for the reason why Jon Arryn is killed and why he is becoming involved in the first place.
The subplot with Dany?
That's just the icing on the cake, like something that you can either read or ignore completely.
The tradition continues on to the second book, after Ned stark's tragedy, the land is divided and the war happens.
We see the brutal aftermath, we see the people fighting for the Iron Throne.
While the plot began to dwindle after the first book, the characters are presented with one goal - that is to fight for the Iron Throne, with a subplot of getting their loved ones back to safety.
However, after the third book everything went downhill.
The war is more or less resolved.
The winner and losers are already evident.
Major character are killed off, new ones are introduced but none of them are coherent anymore.
Everything literally becomes "just shit that happens", and the entire series has become a wait for "something to happen".
And that's why the series has become such a disappointment in so many eyes.
If anyone has to ball to say GRRM can't write for a damn, they have no business in writing or creative industry in general.
However, if anyone says reading A Song of Ice and Fire is becoming increasingly pointless, then you have my more info />I've no doubt that things are going to change now that Dany and Tyrion is coming back to the mainland to reclaim their home, but as it stands today, Game of Thrones is a massive disappointment that has a strong beginning but poorly executed plot throughout the middle.
Chris from Scotland Having just ploughed through the final published book in the series to date, I can only echo all of the sentiments previously expressed by some of the more erudite reviewers and I definitely fall into "the don't waste your time camp".
I did enjoyed the first HBO series in a superficial way but was disappointed with series 2.
Talk about milking it, I for one won't be giving the man who reminds me of a character in Lord of The Rings any more of my hard earned dosh.
Manpreet from India This book is full of all the emotions and elements; this book is a journey full of violence, treachery, loyalty honesty, love, families, romance, conspiracies, back stabbing and much more.
I have read The Lord of the Rings, and I am not adverse to very long series The Wheel of Time is still going and I have no qualms with thatbut Game of Thrones is SO overrated I can scarcely believe it.
The first three books are alright.
Minus a few incredibly laughable and cringey sex scenes and some truly awful characters there are a few interesting scenes one every fifty pages maybe.
I bought them and I do not feel like it was a complete waste of time, but really I do not feel like I have read something exceptional, just an average book, the kind that I have read once and will probably forget after a few years.
The fourth book however.
I can honestly say I have never found a story so dull.
The action is sporadic at best, and dispersed so thinly between sections equivalent to three smaller novels that it really did not feel worth searching for them.
The description lacks originality, the characters are unrealistically extreme and generally just quite irritatingand what few interesting characters Martin did start out with are long gone by the fourth book, lost to unrealistic shifts in character or pointless and unengaging death scenes that are not in any way emotionally affecting.
Maybe it is just my personal taste, but really?
I am shocked at how much hype this has got.
I thought it was just an embarrassment to read, and I am giving my copy to charity as soon as I can.
Maja from Croatia I studied literature and know that some of the best books ever written did not develop stories, characters and endings the way the audience wants or deserves.
It's not a matter of a compromise.
However, these days, for the fact of globalisation we as readers want to think that the book, the author and the reader are one big factory.
I prefer waiting for each book sequence in suspense, even if it does not satisfy my expectations.
JRRM's Song of Ice and Fire in my opinion is simply amazing, and it's definitively not easy to read.
It's like an expanding storm that swirls the characters and plots in concentric circles.
Consumes time for sure, and if you think it's too long - you should read shorter books.
If you think it's overly descriptive - you're missing the beauty of visualisation of every spot and object and character, when you should be grateful to JRRM for letting you see what he is seeing.
It's not a one-read-book and will show you something new every time you reread.
Hans from Belgium I enjoyed reading it.
And i will finish it.
This is mainly because i believe the story has enormous potential to endand i quote the great academic J Clarksonon ' a bombshell'.
But i do have to critisize a bit.
The book is frustratingly long.
Jonathan from United States This is a great and wonderful read, from start to finish it keeps you guessing and gets you involved with each and every character, so much so that you find yourself falling in love with each one of them, even the not so nice ones, and if you see a bad rating it's simply because that person did not get it or understand the plot.
Anon from Sydney, Australia It's not that the author is trying to say that good people die, it's just that a lot of people really don't get what goes on.
It's the most cunning and luckiest that survive.
The characters do tend to change quickly from time to time, which would level my rating down a bit, and some of the characters I love to hate.
It is unpredictable and the last two books have been a droll, again lowering my rating.
Overall, it's a great the rating game book source, and better in quality than a lot of other fantasy novels.
The lore is immersive and detailed, though some parts unecessary.
The book may have started out as Lancaster vs York as in War of the Roses, which is what the books are based on but now it's turned into a massive fight for dominance over land and power, with no one exactly safe and leaving a lot of hype.
Do hope Martin picks up in the next book and hurries it up a bit.
And I don't get why people say the good guys always lose.
The good guys occasionally triumph.
For the people saying that they want to argue why it's not good, wish there was a comment section.
Jon from UK Captain Frogbert, you a clearly a moron who is obsessed with LOTR.
I really don't even know where to start with how wrong you are on every point you made in your review of this book.
If you are really that upset with this book you should just go read LOTR another eleventy twelve times and leave the rest of us alone.
Anon from Anon OMG I have just finished the blooming lot of them and I have to exactly the same confusion, I am utterly exasperated that barely a plot line has been concluded.
The whole thing after the quite good Clash of Kings has become an utter nonsense, time I will never get back.
Sean from Australia It's ok.
He's not a particularly good writer, in terms of characterisation some of the pov writing of the younger characters is execrable and the book is pointlessly long.
I have severe difficulty in accepting that any reader who gave this book 10 stars has seriously thought at all about the possibility that a 15 year old could successfully lead a hardened army into battle without a viceroy pulling he tactical strings or that a 4 year old would be capable of being the master of a a wild wolf.
Ok it's fantasy, but that doesn't mean it has to be total b.
If it wasn't for Tyrion the book would stink quite badly.
Convolution is no substitute for good writing, by the way.
Good for fantasy writing but it ain't great.
Watch the series instead, still contains a teeth- gratingnumber of 'yes, my liege' type conversations, but again, Tyrion saves the day.
Guy from England I am outraged at the position of this series on the top 100 list.
This should be at least second the Malazan Book Of The Fallen is also AWSOME.
Out of the many, many books that I have read these are my favourite: the many interwoven storylines are well thoughtout and presented.
The books set a new level of fantasy, portraying a brutal, gritty and mature story with many hundreds of realistic characters.
There are no good vs evil here, no super powered imortal heroes.
Martin is a master writer, he leaves you laughing and weeping and it is extremly easy to loose yourselve in his world.
Once I got the first book purchased on a whim I was hooked and had read the whole series on the inside of a month.
The book was ok.
Einar from Norway I am sorry to say that I have read five volumes, while my frustration has been steadily increasing.
All the plots are still hanging in the air.
The time I spent reading these books feels like a waste of time, and I can absolutely not recommend them to anybody.
Matthew from US Boring.
It's not that I don't get it.
It's simply that nothing happens.
People try to say that if you don't like it you are not smart enough to understand all the intricacies and nuances, or whatever, but I think that the opposite is true.
I think that it is less intelligent people that are easily wrapped up in that stuff.
It's just like a soap opera.
There is no story.
There is no point.
I can't believe this ever got published, let alone made into a show.
PS I usually try to avoid saying this, but since a guy pointed out his genius level IQ in his good review, I want to point out that I also have a genius level IQ.
Karen from England The Review, Part 2.
To cut a long story short, this might have made a decent trilogy, but frankly, life's too short for stuff that goes on.
Karen from England Just started this a couple of days ago, Martin is a new writer to me and after reading the reviews I've got to say I've never seen a fantasy author divide opinion so much.
Five stars based on what I've read so far, although that might change in the course of time.
Tyrion Lannister - best character so far, no contest.
Andy from uk the most engrossing read i just couldnt put it down.
John from Canada I did not enjoy book one from the first sentence, although there is a soap opera quality about the lame writing style that keeps tricking you that some time down the road, something by the middle of the book ANYTHING would have been good will happen eventually.
By three quarters of the way through, I was still free o reilly books the verge of putting it down, especially since after 600 or so pages I was still basically uninterested in a single character, and I've seen Bazooka Joe comics with more depth, but that soap opera drug laced in between the lines kept me going.
Until a war breaks out between the Lannisters and the Starks, and Martin describes the horns as having a haroooooooooooooo sound, and the Lannister trumpets as a Do-DA, Do-DAAAAAAAAAAAA.
I have never laughed so hard as I put a book down in my life.
We have an author who trumped his own horrible writing with a trumpet.
Nice attempt at onomatopoeia.
Uday from Canada I think most of the readers giving negative remarks just either can't take the complexity of the story or are the kind of people that have to have everybody live and have a corny happy ending.
I mean one of the great things that GRRM has done with this series is how he makes you really love the characters-yes even Cersei- and how he isn't afraid of actually killing off those characters.
That alone makes the story so much more interesting and suspenseful, because you never know when any character might die.
Also, as for those of you saying that you don't see the importance of characters like Jon, Dany and Sansa you just haven't read far enough into the series.
They're chapters become very interesting and you can really relate to them.
The first three books have to be the best.
The characters are rich, writing style superb, more of the fantasy and magic further on in the series and way the chapters are split really make you see things on a much larger scale and make you appreciate the effort of all that detail even more.
Another thing, it takes lots of superb writing and imagination to not just use the "magic" part of fantasy to solve all of the conflicts, and than you can appreciate characters like Tyrion who use their intellect a lot more.
If you liked the Wheel of Time I feel you will like the Song of Ice and Fire series just as much or more.
Doto from Ruskiland The first 2 books were good I thought.
The rest felt like author already ran out of anything new to say and were full of filler.
The characters started to turn from believable to completely poor.
The story stopped advancing.
Then the author started to introduce 999999999 different characters that I was starting to get lost in not to mention completely not care about while the characters I thought were interesting were dropped or have a few uninteresting chapters filled with adjective filler instead of witty dialogue or plot.
I recommend first 1-2 books the rest are just cash cow.
Jake from United States Personally, Click the following article find people who really criticize this series only look at things on the surface it's too long, too many characters, too graphic, poor characters, etc.
They don't look at things deeper, try and see why things are the way they are, and just think of this great series as a pointless kill fest.
In reality, a lot of the space is meant to build tension and expand on things, the characters are much deeper than people give them credit for, and if you can't follow along then there is nothing I can do for you.
Also, why would anyone say Martin's writing is bad?
I think his prose is excellent and really develops emotion, atmosphere, and setting.
Brian from USA Do yourself a favor and read Lackey's collaborative series that starts with 'The Shadow of the Lion' about convoluted politics in byzantine fantasy Italy if you are interested in gritty, deeply-laid plots, rich character development, and epic scope in a fantasy world.
Don't get me wrong, I genuinely like Martin.
His collaboration with, and editing of, the Wildcard series probably changed the face and raised the bar of the entire superhero genre for all time, but this particular series evokes echoes of L.
Ron Hubbard more than it does Tolkien, Machiavelli, or Jordan.
Colby from USA Where to start?
A few years back my cousin made it his mission to get everyone in our circle of friends to read the series.
When news hit that HBO was going to make a show out of it and all my friends raving about the series I decided "why not" and gave the first book a try.
Didn't hate the book but was definitely let down.
Gave Martin the benefit of the doubt that this book was just used as introduction and setup for the rest of the series, and that I was in for a ride.
Made it through the first 200 pages of the third book and.
I can't say this is a BAD book by any means.
I just find it very convoluted and overrated.
Martin seems so determined to ram quantity over quality down throat.
Too many characters, plot lines, and too many descriptions of each.
It reminds me of going to a restaurant that has everything on the menu, from sushi, steaks, chicken wings, spaghetti, chili, enchiladas, lobster, and pizza, and none of it turns out very good.
I'd rather have the eatery that focuses and bangs out a few key specialties every night.
I found it very hard to connect with the characters when I'd read about them for 1 chapter and then have them disappear for 80 pages at a time.
There were times where I'd already forget what said POV character was doing the last time I read about him because of the length of absence.
I've read the first 2.
Or Jon Snow for that matter.
Cut these two out and I don't see how the main plot changes.
Even when someone dies, 2-3 more characters are added which diminishes the whole point of the dying character's death.
I also thought fantasy books were supposed to contain fantasy?
It merely seems to be sprinkled in so far instead of embracing it.
What I'm seeing so far is two main parties Starks and Lannisters fighting over who runs the country, I could turn it to C-SPAN and watch that.
For something that is deemed as fantasy, it's incredibly down to earth.
I don't mind sex reads and gory violence if it's done right.
I mean, 50 Shades of Grey is quite popular right now with the former.
Martin's scenes though just seem to be spontaneous acts to show.
I don't know what.
As if everyone does it to pass the time.
It's the kind of reading I would have loved when I was a horny 14 year old kid but as an adult I don't see it adding anything.
Last criticism, the pacing of the story is way too slow for my taste.
Most of this is due to the excessive number of characters and sub plots.
Martin ends up weighing the series down rather moving it along.
I want the small sports car that zips down the highway, not the diesel that lumbers and slugs along.
All of this could have been avoided if Martin would simply realize that his story contains fat in need of trimming.
The greatest authors can tell a fantastic story in the least amount of words.
Since there are plenty of Lord of the Rings comparisons, here's another.
Counting the Hobbit, Tolkien was able to create Middle-Earth in roughly 1200-1300 pages.
Martin has already written about 4000 pages and is nowhere close to finishing his tale.
Leads me to believe he can't bring it all together.
But let me end on what Martin does get right.
He can deem up a few entertaining characters, whether good see more evil.
Joffrey and Cersei might be despicable, loathsome characters but we'd be bored without them.
Then we have the devious cunning of Littlefinger and Tyrion.
Or the wise beyond her years, Arya.
Also, when something actually does happen for a change, Martin does a really good job keeping the reader click here and eagerly turning the pages until I get to a Sansa or Dany chapter that is.
The climax and twists genuinely did keep me guessing as to what happens next.
Again, this is not a bad series but could have been so much more.
My advice, skip the books and watch the HBO series.
It keeps the relevant story bits and edits out the cumbersome pace of the books.
Forrest from Florida I will admit, the first three books had me enthralled.
However, when I started turning the pages of book four, I started skipping paragraphs, pages and finally chapters.
I understand if you want to tell a story from multiple perspectives, but I would rather not read from a characters perspective that I detest, it's annoying.
Pray do tell, what is the point of giving the ENTIRE history of an unlikable character ex: Cerseijust for them to remain hated, with no advancement of the story?
Also, when the entirety of every sixth paragraph focuses on what the character is eating, with excruciating detail, it becomes repetitive and boring.
That, and the overly descriptive nature of every character and castle make this story a screenplay, not a book.
Ed from California This complete series is a promise of things to come.
Every interesting character disappears in one way or another.
How repetitive can you get?
It seems like Martin's plot was to disappoint us with every character.
What aggravates me the most is that the story and characters had such potential when it began.
I suggest you read the first couple books and get out of Dodge, unless you prefer "Rocky Balboa gets killed in a car crash on his way to the fight"!
I have had this dream before.
Wes from Australia First off - this series isn't for everyone.
It introduces a lot of characters, so if you struggle with that you won't like it.
Second, no one is safe.
For this, I love the series.
But for many people who need to have their heroes survive - you will hate this.
Third, the writing is long - but beautifully written, and I think some people will miss a lot of the intricacies and don't quite get the writing style.
This series breaks a lot of convention, but if you can handle that and have the patience you will love it!
If you struggle with multiple characters, need a safe happy warm ending and like a more traditional style this series isn't for you, and frankly that is where a lot of these negative comments are coming from.
Also many of the negative reviews abandoned the ll slot booking early on, and in my opinion the second volume of Storm of Swords is where it gets amazing.
One reviewer felt characters got killed off and the story arcs ended there - to that, I say they aren't getting the bigger picture, but I won't say specifics as not to reveal any spoilers.
Bear in mind it will be years before the next book, so if you don't want to wait that long and possibly many years after that for the final book then you might want to avoid the series.
Jon from England Overall, a very good series.
The last two not so good, but still a reasonable read I'm hoping that Martin will pick up his game again for the next books.
It's been levelled here that he's not the best writer in the world and that's probably fair, but then neither was Tolkien and he was an Oxford don and I'm unlikely to read Erikson or Jordan for their literary value either, if it comes to it.
He tells a good story and, whilst they're not as atypical as some reviews might like to suggest, he creates characters that you actually care about.
This is evidenced here by the number of peole moaning about how he's killed off their favourite characters - it wouldn't upset you if you didn't like them.
One thing that I particularly like about the series is the sparing use of magic.
It's always been an annoyance in fantasy that when faced with a difficult situation, the writer could quite literally wave a magic wand at it.
It also increases the impact on the reader when there actually is magic.
As a result, this isn't a series for fans of more overtly magical fantasy.
There aren't wizards, elves, goblins and orcs pouring out of the woodwork here.
I think that due to the size of the series, there are now a lot of plot strands for Martin to hold together.
This means that, firstly, it's tough to follow some times and secondly, it's tough for Martin to write.
As a result, it takes him a while to get each installment written, so you need patience and a good memory.
Finally, there's a lot of sex and violence.
Ivan from Canada Wow, these books are incredible.
Best books I've ever read.
Do not listen to the trolls calling it poorly written.
The number of different story lines and character incentives is incredible.
Probably too much for some readers to understand and they get lost with the amount of characters.
Do yourself a favour and get these books!!!!!
Brett from Canada Not sure if half the people are elitest or the other half are fanboys but I found the book very engrossing, funny and angering at times although I hate that he killed off my 3 favorite characters.
Emina from Melbourne, Australia I haven't read the book, and after reading most of the reviews I have no desire to.
I mean even, when the movie came out I didn't really find the plot that interesting, or should I say the idea.
Also, to the really super smart "genius" above, what does an IQ have to do with what you like??
Yours, was by far the stupidest comment ever!
Hazel from Canada Mediocre writing.
Killing with no apparent direction.
Despite my disappointment in these areas I read the first book long enough to be taken hostage by the characters only to be gravely disappointed I'd ever continued later on in the series.
Sad from United States Those reviews make me really sad.
Basically, people are just coming to GRRM books because they cannot read, and are watching HBO series.
Both the TV series and the books are really bad.
First, there is the constant repetition of words in sentences and sentences in paragraphs.
Is like a copy and paste work of a lazy writer.
Second, characters are really shallow.
None of them have any serious psychological crossroads and issues, they are just the same hack-and-slash brutes, or honorable-idiot-naive, in different nuances.
Third, the world building is basically pathetic.
How can a planet have winters of decades that don't even follow a regular pattern?
Also, deserts grow south, while the north the cold part, how creative.
So, that planet must have some very eccentric orbit.
There is no folklore, there is no culture, there are no strong religions, just a mix-up of our Earth religions and taken from the summaries on an Elementary school encyclopedia.
Fourth, he keeps repeating himself because he is a really bad writer that "writes as he goes", so he needs a lot of Deus Ex Machina events on order to solve the issues and questions that are carried out through the books.
And, nevertheless, he cannot make the story get a proper pace.
I, unfortunately, had to read the five books two times, one on a basis of 150 to 200 pages per day, and the second time, on a fixed basis of 50 pages per day, as I had to make a complete, encyclopedic, critical summary, with all the style mistakes, a deep analysis of plots and characters, and so on.
So, I can consider myself a specialist in this series, and that is why I can state: it is really one of the worse literary works in the history of Mankind.
Pete Bates from UK Maurice felt the need to state he has an IQ of 147, this makes him anything but a genius.
As for the book, it's over-indulgent.
The plot itself is overly complex, hindering rather than aiding the story as a whole.
They're too many narrative strands just leading to a slow moving behemoth with all slots book of ra meaning being saturated in too many separate narratives.
He tries to incorporate too much of his stories fabula and world into the story creating a contrived, mess of narratives.
His world is rich and this could have been shown to greater effect in a far more controlled narrative.
Martin appears to be a man with many great ideas whilst lacking the control to properly put them into practice.
Maurice from Cayman Islands Anyone not loving this series must be seriously dull or retarded.
I have an IQ of 147, making me a genius and have read just about all the great fantasy series.
This series yields to none.
Alex from Italy The best book I ever read, just finished the third book and I can't get enough of it!
Andy from Ottawa, Canada When I read these books and I did read 1-5 there was not one moment where I was not totally into it.
After book 1-3 there are no requirements for big battles scenes at least until the characters are deemed ready to do so.
Its fantasy, its action, its drama, its horror, its all I need all at once.
Michael from Sydney I have to agree with the more negative reviews: the first couple of books are not too bad, but its going downhill and it soon loses its way.
Characters seem to be killed off for no particular reason and entire plot-lines disappear with them and are not replaced by anything interesting.
The series is bloated and self-indulgent.
Its a shame because it seemed to have so much potential as I read the first book.
First lesson that Martin needs to learn: Less is More.
The great authors understand this and their books are still being read decades later: Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, Le Guin's Earthsea, Howard's Conan, Moorcock's Elric.
Martin doesn't get it and I don't have time to read to the end of an increasingly turgid five-part series to indulge him.
Alan from Canada The first 2 books are great, 3 is mildly entertaining but not great.
Stopped reading the 4th book midway through.
Too bad nobody thought Martin needed an editor.
Less is more, pal.
Gary from England Started reading this series of books after being amazed by the HBO Series.
I thought the first 2 books really drew you in to the stories and made you care for and hate the characters.
Unfortunately from book 3 onwards the story has lost it's edge and Martin seems to be telling the story for the sake of it rather than developing the characters we once cared for, he seems to think that killing of the people we root for is a way of keeping the reader interested, it ultimately has the reverse effect.
It reminds my of lots of US series such as Lost, Fringe and many more who have an excellent early series but then struggle to maintain the intensity.
I book free download currently reading A Dance with Dragons and even though I already have Winds of Winter waiting in the wings I may not even bother opening it if A dance with Dragons continues with it's plod through the seven kingdoms.
Cathy from Ohio No denying that George R.
Martin is a talented author and plot initiator.
Each release was a greater and greater disappointment.
He is nothing compared to Tolkien, where a true story was woven and hope against a crueler world was presented to a thirsty audience.
These books just present cruelty and avarice as mankind's inheritance - perfect for Hollywood.
Plato from Timbuktu Nice writing style, excellent plot, amazing world.
I love how Martin weaves together seemingly unconnected plotlines and shows us so many perspectives, giving us a much more sophisticated understanding of the story.
The world Martin created is awesomely huge and complicated, although the endless introductions of new characters can be hard to get into.
Also, the not-deaths get pretty annoying after a while.
Other than this, I have no criticism for the series, and am eagerly awaiting the release of the 6th book.
Ron from USA I love fantasy.
I read to escape the world and maybe learn a bit along the way.
But when I read this book I actually wanted to escape it, rather than use it as an escape.
The characters are dark, and the only decent ones are either subjected to horrible circumstances and changed to be dark, or killed.
There are a few interesting characters but they are shoved to the side to make way for the more "interesting and human" characters that go around killing and raping.
This book is slow, boring, and dark, and if that's what you want then good for you.
But if you want a book that's interesting, or just actually goes anywhere in less than 5 books, than you should probably look elsewhere.
Nat from India Well I had heard a lot about this book online and saw that it had got great reviews from everyone, moreover the HBO series of AGOT was also there so I finally decided to read this one.
The book is um something very unique and good in its own way.
It's gritty and mature more to the extent than I had anticipated, the plot is laid out brilliantly.
The storyline and characters are good though it seems that Martin according to me didn't satisfactorily end it.
The tortures through which the characters are put through and it seems that Martin's focus on keeping things like this makes me wonder that there won't be a great ending to this thing and things would cross to such an extent that it wouldn't matter at all.
One more thing is that it's surprising a bit that there is absolutely next to no magic though there are some fantasy elements but for most of the times it seems like maybe a non fantasy novel.
The book was with all things still great.
Full of twists and surprises.
Definitely a good read though maybe not for everyone.
Gary A from Australia Books 1 and 2 are great.
Book 3 is ok.
Books 4 and 5 are garbage.
The fact that books 4 and 5 are are garbage makes everythig in the first three books garbage as well.
The plots that were set up in the first two books all just melt away.
Characters that have been developed over many many pages are just terminated with all their associated plots just left hanging where there once could have been a good story.
This is a great concept but this guy is just trying to tell too much story and it looks to me that he was sick of writing it by book 4 and just wanted it done.
At the end of book 1 and book 2 you can't wait to read the next one.
Don't waste your time or your money.
David from USA Read through the 3rd book and going to stop.
While I enjoy the read, have the same complaints of over subplot development without any conclusions or wrap up.
There is no end, a good story should have beginning middle and end.
Other than killing off characters, no conclusions or endings.
After over 3000 pages no hope of an outcome.
Very disappointed because I was entranced by the first book.
After speaking to several friends who finished the series, they all told me to stop where I am.
Jani from Finland I can't really understand many of the reviews posted here.
The sex scenes I don't have a problem with.
It's not like they are great, but I don't get ticked off about them either.
The only complaint I agree with is the occasionally dull storyline Arya's chapters mostly but there are just more good chapters than bad.
But the thing I really don't get is the overwhelming complaining of G.
Martin killing the likeable characters.
I mean come on people!
I might be forgetting someone but not anyone special.
Remember, Catelyn DOES NOT die, Bran and Rickon don't die either, not Davos, not Tyrion, not Jaime, not Daenerys, not Brienne, not Arya and it also seems that the Hound is still alive, working with his sins as are gravedigger.
I am pretty sure that Jon doesn't die in book 5 either, just another Martin cliffhanger.
A lot of the unlikeable characters have died.
Joffrey, The Mountain, Balon Greyjoy and Theon is a spacecase.
I myself found the books great, but a rating of 9 is accurate because George is occasionly stretching the storyline through cliffhangers and dull chapters.
Frank from Cork The best fantasy series of all time in my opinion.
It's a complex plot that makes you work and even re-read the books to pick up the clues, but if you do then you will be rewarded.
It's not for everyone and if you want instant gratification, black and white good guys and bad guys, clean-cut dragon-slaying heroes, evil wizards, etc.
If you're the type of idiot who skips whole chapters and still expects to get something from the book, then ASoIaF is most certainly not for you.
GRRM is a genius and this series is a brilliantly woven masterpiece.
That said, I'm not surprised by some of the negative comments, there will always be people who prefer the likes of 50Cent to Beethoven.
Matt Cole from Vancouver BC If writers are Gods — and they are — then George R.
Martin is Zeus, King of The rating game book />Martin flawlessly weaves a tale of epic fantasy to launch, which is arguably the best fantasy series ever I know The Lord of The Rings and The Malazan Empire have their fans.
Tyrion, Sandor Clegane the HoundCersei, Arya, and Daenerys are particularly memorable.
This first installment is not heavily loaded with magic and the supernatural.
Other than the appearance of a supernatural race in the opening pages and again briefly later on, and the emergence of other mythological creatures in the closing pages, Game of Thrones is devoid of magic and the supernatural.
The conflict is among men and women, noble houses positioning themselves for the throne of a Kingdom.
The book is just click for source with political intrigue, conspiracy, ambition, and hidden family secrets.
Still, while the great houses maneuver for control of the throne, the reader is ever aware of a long dormant evil, that may rise to threaten the populace of the seven kingdoms.
As per the suggestion from other reviewers that this book is too explicit, I can say I have no idea where this is coming from.
I would not consider either the sex or violence in this book too explicit.
Certainly Steven Erikson and R.
Scott Bakker have gone farther in their series.
Roland from South Africa Man oh man, where do I start?
I was looking for another fantasy epic after reading Lord of the Rings and found the first book and I bought it, probably read the first 30 to 40 pages and I was so dissapointed!
I just stopped there.
Come on don't we have enough misery in the REAL world!
And really like some of the how to beat of ra slot machine said: a 48-year-old man writing about explicit deeds done to 13-year-old girls?
That is quite creepy and out of character for real fantasy.
If any prospective readers are reading this, please stop and don't make the same mistake I did: NOT READING THE READER REVIEWS!
It makes all the difference.
To sum it up: What a sad Song of Fire and Ice.
Barb from Wisconsin I took the time to read all 5 books in the series and when I got to the end of book number 5, I felt like it had been a big waste of time.
Within each book, Martin introduced countless characters, meandered off into numerous storylines and spent endless pages on descriptions and conversations that were of no story value.
By the end of book number 5 not one storyline came to a conclusion and I was left wondering what had happened to or would happen with all the characters that had been introduced.
Additionally, I felt like I had suffered through so much death, destruction, perversity and nasty sex scenes that not having anything conclude was especially disappointing.
Martin clearly got himself into a typing frenzy and forgot about how to really develop and tell a story.
If you choose to read all 5 books, prepare yourself for disappointment.
The Eragon series by Paolini who started writing his series in his early teens was better written than Game of Thrones and there is certainly no positive comparison to be made of Game of Thrones to J.
Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.
John from Ljubljana I have read the first three books and they are all fantastic to read; they involve everything a great fantasy book needs.
The series has an absurd amount of astonishingly realistic characters who couldn't be more different and yet at the same time they are all still the characters inhabiting this amazing fantasy world.
I fell in love with the Game of Thrones almost immediately, mainly because of unexpected turns and twists, that are not so common in this genre.
I highly recommend it to all fantasy fans out there.
Cat Fitzpatrick from London, UK I think a main reason why there is such a difference in opinion regarding this series is that the fantasy element is very small compared to the huge volume of story.
The main strength of A Song of Ice and Fire lies in the politics of a kingdom embroiled in a civil war where there isn't just two armies battling for the throne, there are up to seven various forces struggling to lay claim to either part or the whole of Westeros.
There are very good characters that come through - Tyrion Lannister for one is really interesting, and I really like the deviousness of Petyr Baelish - but as you go through the books the volume of characters increases, which can swamp the story in parts, and characters can vanish for quite a long time whilst the others are worked through.
The story can be quite slow and repetitive, and not enough time is spent to really build all of the main characters as well as they could be.
Sex is also overused with everybody at it like rabbits or raping their way up and down the length of Westeros.
However, some great set pieces are developed such as the use of wildfire in a river battle, and if you like epic stories this is richly detailed if maybe too over ambitious as to the amount of stuff crammed in.
It's worth a read, but takes a lot of investment of time to get to the good bits.
Jeffrey from Missouri First one is pretty good, but as others say, it goes downhill from there.
I am near the end of 3rd one, and what I keep thinking of is that this is just like the daytime soaps on TV.
It has turned into an endless series of twists and turns, where you can predict that just when one of the "good guys" just about get to a good place, some unlikely twist will prevent them from getting there.
The villians, when they lose, get banished, etc.
The sympathetic characters are all telegraphed simply by the names of the chapters.
The twists seem to be just for the sake of throwing in a twist to keep the story going, not to advance the plot towards a conclusion.
I will probably finish the series, because I have invested enough in knowing what happens, but as I read it I have this gut feeling like I am wasting my time.
Regarding the prose and characters.
I hear people praising the prose.
When I first started the book, I could not help but think of "A Conneticut Yankee at Https://filmman.ru/book/download-book-of-ra-game.html Arthur's Court" by Mark Twain.
He does a wonderful send-up of the whole "knights in shining armor" style in that wonderful parody.
I give it a 4 because despite the many weaknesses I see, I AM still reading it, so something must be done right.
Tyler from US One of the most drawn out stories with so little action and magic I've read.
Isn't the story I had hoped to read.
Sid This is easily the most overrated series in history.
It's not abysmal, mind you, but it's not great either.
The first couple of books are actually page-turners as Martin's style makes for very quick and fairly entertaining reads.
The attention is kept high through the use of plot-devices like cliffhangers, random character killing and equally random adult scenes.
Later on it develops into something more magic-oriented with undead and dragons.
Overall the plot is not that bad but it's terribly slow-paced and NOT original, especially in later books.
Some are well built at least in the initial "cast" but if the author really thinks his characters are realistic and "grey" he is deluding himself.
Most of them are flat and play the same stereotyped part throughout the entire series the first 5 books at least.
There are occasional side-changes but they're quite predictable and far from being mind-blowing.
Lots of important characters die in these books.
Because if you want to kill your characters you have to REPLACE them somehow.
GRRM apparently exausted his creativity in giving birth to the first "batch" of characters and every subsequent entry is even MORE dull, flat and utterly uninteresting.
Random, useless sex scenes every 50 pages or so?
At first it's somewhat entertaining but after 3 books you'll just say "Owww, again??!?!?!??
The level of detail can be painful at times.
Allow me to say it once more: the adult scenes in this series are useless, gratuitous and boring.
This is little more than a moneymaking franchise, decent at first but getting worse and worse with every installment.
There are A LOT of fantasy series much, much better than this.
David from Netherlands I've read a lot of Fantasy.
I guess this book was never meant purely for the Fantasy fans.
This book transvers from the individual FFans to the general public.
That in itself is a great achievemend.
I've read the books.
The massiveness about this story is good.
The multiple threads, the mulitple main characters.
It gives it a lot of credibility.
It is actually the strongest point of this project.
There's almost no speed to the pace of this story.
It goes on and on without much spectacular happening.
There are no really great crushing scenes that stay in my mind, where I can almost quote the whole LOTR trilogy by memory alone.
I must convess even though I've read the whole series twice to get in back in order after the long period of waiting for the next book I still cant remember a lot of it.
If you want a real great, slightly faster paced story with at least things happening and some things able to linger I would advice Robert Jordan.
Andreas from Sweden Have to say that this must be one of the most overestimated books ever.
He can write a whole chapter without shit happening.
I have read to the middle of book 4 and I have to say, he kills of every single character that's interesting.
Or he stops telling the story about them.
First book starts of good.
But from when Ed dies its just downhill.
I don't get ppl that says that amazing is and to low.
You need to read more books, some good books.
I don't want to finish the books but I feel that I have to, too much invested now.
Thank god that I didnt pay for it.
I would like to talk to George Martin and ask him just how the fuck he thought when he wrote this.
On the plus side, I enjoyed the story-telling.
But got bored of the endless descriptions of armour by the end.
This is written to be a best seller - nice and easy to read, without much depth.
It lacks literary merit, the language is poor and the descriptions not particularly evocative.
The real silliness seems to be his lack of imagination: The map of Westeros is an enlarged Britain, with the capital roughly where London is, and a big wall for Hadrian's wall.
North of the wall are savages poor Scots and there are vestiges of the indigenous Celtic religion in the wild woods.
The 'civilized' have the conqueror's Christian religion of course but it doesn't seem as exciting - surprise, surprise.
Barbarian hordes with their own savage ways threaten from across the continent, and the main action consists of conflict between the House of Stark York and Lannister Lancaster.
I did like the idea of a really long Summer and Winter though, presumably this comes into more play in about 10,000 pages time.
Some people seem to think the book's greatness lies in its 'grittiness' or its muddying of good and evil.
Yet, throughout the book there is really no doubt which side is good and which is evil.
And although he supposedly told the story from different perspectives, there was little change of voice - a missed opportunity.
So, I guess, yes, it's like Tolkien,but without his depth, language or imagination.
Will from USA I read this book and its sequel, but could go no further.
I feel like Martin's method of telling the story from each character's perspective was interesting, but ultimately seemed to compel him to write ridiculously long chapters about characters that are of very little interest.
The amount of explicit click the following article thrown into the novel is absolutely excessive, weighing down the novel with a layer of filth that in no way progress the story.
As other https://filmman.ru/book/kiit-date-slot-booking.html have mentioned, I have no problem with this content being included, but it quickly losses the little shock value it had, and does nothing to progress the novel.
The different elements contained in the book are split by region.
In the south, politics, wars, and other such evils of man occur.
The "evil" generally wins out and personally, I grew quite tired by the lack of anything good.
In the north there is an ominous wall, which is supposed to hold https://filmman.ru/book/warriors-free-books.html all the real bad guys.
Martin generated a large interest in me for this region, despite it being a bland place of over done evils: zombies, shape shifters.
This region is where the magic seems to lay, but a minimal amount is seen.
There is also the region where the dragon queen lives.
I do not know her name.
I do not know what she has been doing.
All I know is that after two books and what felt like an endless amount of chapters dedicated to her, and she has managed to acquire three boats.
Ultimately, this separation serves to make the reader more inclined to read only certain character's chapters.
Regions are made to seem so distant as they have had minimal if any interaction makes it seem like it would be better to split the books by region.
The characters you don't connect with you will not read.
And you probably will not connect many characters, and the ones you do connect with just die.
These sudden deaths get approval from others claiming how shocking and "gutsy" it was to do such a thing.
The reality is that the author source them off in such a manner that the reader is left wondering.
Why did the Character die?
A rarely answered question Do I care that this character died?
Most characters named upon death are some distant cousin to some character you read about through someone else's perspective 125 pages earlier.
Did the character really just die?
Turns out, the author lies to you, saying certain characters have died, and bringing them back to life later.
Killing characters off was something I once did in high school writing assignments to be done with said character.
I got a similar impression that this was Martin's use as well.
Characters themselves get varied levels of treatment to development.
Most of them did not make it past infancy, or after two books are still stuck in that.
I will not be reading thousands of pages to figure out what could have been put into two books.
There is no real conclusion after this book and the sequel.
I no longer care about the conclusion.
I did not know the HBO series existed upon reading this, and still have not watched it.
If you thought Eragon was a poor fantasy novel, then you're end for a prompt demand to re-appraise your rating of it.
The frustration I went through reading A Game of Thrones were tremendous.
Normally, I enjoy fantasy good and bad a great deal.
The worlds may have been strange in some cases, but imaginative.
A Game of Thrones fell short of every positive thing I had heard said about it.
Except I suppose the cover art was pretty good.
Andrew from Canada I haven't read the book, just commenting on the COMMENTS.
People who don't like it: they find it too explicit and lacking in coherent story telling plot lines.
People who like it: love the explicit content and just want others to like it too, without much else reason.
Based on that I don't think I'll get it.
James from Philadelphia This is one of my favorite series of all time.
Being able to understand so many different characters' perspectives on the books' events makes the series an extremely interesting read.
Books 1-3 are absolutely brilliant.
I am eagerly awaiting the final two installments and I hope they can live up to the promise that the series has shown up till now.
Big from Daz As with many of the above I came to these books via the HBO series which I thought was excellent, I am now on book 5 and starting to feel like the whole thing is being padded out to make someone extra 'coin '.
Most of the story and main characters either died or came to an end by book 4, as someone above said I really get the feeling Martin is bored himself, or planned to bring it all to an end around this point.
The bit with Ayra going backwards and forwards in the book was made so much better in the mini series they cut it out!
The sex scenes are too much, Martin has a worrying sexual fantassy with Dany a very young girl in the book, touching herself, exploring her sexuality, was it neccesary?
I was surprised at the age of many of his characters in the books, presumed they would grow over the course but then he kills them?
The mini series cuts out a lot of the fantasy stuff, seems to be staying away from the warg thing, green dreams, giants etc certainly not spending the time on it that Martin does and it's so much better for it.
Here's hoping the tv series keeps this to a minimum and maybe doesn't kill off Rob!
When it comes to rating I am marking down on the basis that one book I've just read part one of two started and ended having gone absolutley nowhere.
I get the feeling he wanted to end the whole thing around book 4, still going to stick it out to the end but don't expect to be able to make any character attachments.
Rupert from England Have just finished book 5 - is there a book 6?
Lots of stories left unanswered.
What happens to Bran, or Arya, the Wall, the Free People, Denares, the dragons, Stannis?
Richard from Washington, DC Martin seems to think that incessant scenes of rape, murder and incest equal "adult".
He fails to realize that this is just pandering to the lowest common denominator.
We get it, it's a hard old world!
Somewhere in all the thousands of pages, where he tells you what everyone is wearing and what every knight's heraldry looks like, there may be a good story.
But after three books I couldn't find it and have given up.
His prose is plodding, and using characters' full names all the time is annoying at best, as it feels like filler and ruins any rythym he might have had.
Almost all the characters are unlikeable and he seems grand gaming slots johannesburg think killing any character that might be worth rooting for makes him "edgy".
Sorry, it just makes him lazy.
You just get the feeling he doesn't know where to go with these characters, and so he kills them off.
Besides, keeping them around might mean he would have to resolve storylines instead of keeping the money machine going with new characters and even more pointless storylines that he can end two books down the line when he runs out of idead for them.
And enough with the incest!
I wonder about him, if he can't think of any way of showing sexual relationships besides rape and incest.
He's not writing an epic fantasy series.
He's wrinting a porn soap opera.
Tonya from Paterson The reason most of us read is to escape the sometimes harsh reality of life.
In Games of Thrones I couldn't put the first book down, however I soon realized that evil was prevailing far too often.
There isn't enough relief for the good guys.
As an audience you need comedy, love and laughter just as much as tragedy and pain - there is an inbalance to these stories and killing off damn near ever underdog was just plain wrong.
I was totally disappointed.
Pat from Boston, MA It starts out meeting a family that you immediately like and generally root for, some more then others but overall good start.
I thought some pages or hundreds could be edited out but because the story was so strong and the characters so good I wasn't upset reading page after page.
I was wishing I could read faster most times but by book 3-4 the story goes stale for me.
I thought killing off the "good guy" and leader of the story was awesome.
In a way I hate this book, it sucks, but then seeing the great changes smaller characters make to combat his death make you fall in love with Robb Stark, Arya, Jon Snow and even Jamie Lannister.
But after the "Red Wedding" the book to me became stupid, "bad guys" get 2nd 3rd and 4th chances while people you care about are killed off without hesitation or meaning.
Theon, Jamie, Cersie, Varys, Baelish and even the Vlegane brothers are never killed off like Ned or Rob and now maybe Jon.
I feel like Martin backed himself into a corner as people and agree with the statement that he's grown bored with this story.
Well, why do you think that?
Please get the story back on track and have a Stark win.
My rating now is a 5, after book 2 it was a 9 or 10.
Erik from Ohio The first three books are great.
They held my attention throughout with lots of different things the rating game book in the same time period due to the variety of characters.
I like the setup of writing chapters about certain characters, and it's even more exciting when one character's fate brings them alongside another main character in the same chapter.
I wish GRRM would have kept the Starks intact with their direwolves completing the immensely strong family, but it's not all happy endings in life either.
Dave from Maryland Got through part of the fourth book and quit.
Seriously, WTF is up with killing off or drastically screwing up the life of every character you get attached to?
I thought killing off Ned was cutting edge and suprising.
Evil seems to always win, and that just gets old.
A good thing once in a while would have kept me hopeful.
If I want to see reality of human behavior, I can read article the news; the hope with a book is to escape to a better place.
This series becomes a hell instead.
Captain Frogbert from New York I read the first book of this series and was thoroughly pleased to see the back of it.
Martin is, at best, a mediocre writer; a comparison to Michael Crichton would not be inappropriate: Plodding, trite, calculated, repetitive.
Add to that his clumsy attempts to invent language by misspelling common words and you have the worst sort of middlebrow hackery.
Oh, yes, calling a knight 'Ser' instead of Sir, really makes me feel like I'm in another world.
And Maester does the same thing.
One of his common "creative" threads is to make things BIGGER.
His "Eyrie" isn't just a tall tower like Barad Dur or Orthanc, it's a really, really, really tall tower like Barad Dur or Orthanc only TALLER — see how subtly better it is?
As for the world he has "created," well, his Dothraki are just yet another take on the Mongols can you say Horseclans or the Dalrei of Guy Gavriel Kay's Fionavar Tapestry?
The rest of the world is even worse, a pale pastiche of dark ages Europe via a worn carbon copy of J.
Off the top of my head, I can name you a dozen or more fantasy worlds with more depth and variety.
As for his characters, what a stifling band of dull, predictable, stick figures poorly disguised as plot devices or was it the other way around?
He tromps through his life growling and bemoaning his fate, never suspecting that the people EVERYONE ELSE KNOWS are the bad guys are going to do him in by lying, a concept he apparently cannot bring himself to understand, much less guard against.
Then he gets tossed in prison and, eleventy-twelve pages of other stuff happening later, comes out and recants his entire life and is killed.
Applause, applause all around.
Ooooh, what daring, killing off the main character like that.
Of course we never see his captivity or torture.
We never learn WHY he recants and loses his honor, we are simply left to presume that he was broken.
His death has no meaning because its entire reason for happening is so casually tossed away.
Oh well, off to the next whore house for him!
The rest of the characters are just as bad, little more than scrapings from the bottom of the central casting barrel.
The fat King Henry VIII via Falstaffthe evil queen how original!
This novel is soooo bad!
Game of Thrones is a lousy story, set in a boring world, written by a man who has no understanding of plot, pacing, story or character arc, or anything else a good writer understand.
And who is, apparently, utterly lacking in the basic ability to edit his work or simply to please!
Avoid this novel if you possibly can.
Modesto from New York This is a great adult fantasy series.
This story is not for everyone.
Especially for people who like sexy elves and tough dwarfs.
Not for those who seek instant gratification.
This is fantasy, a whole new fantasy, an adult fantasy.
I love how people are mad that certain characters are killed off but yet they bash the book, if you were not hooked and attached to the character you wouldn't care someone got knocked off.
This story is fantasy, thriller, exotic and poetic, you can argue it's real, if Westeros existed and Dothraki.
That is how people would have lived, killed and ventured.
It would be A Song of Ice and Fire!
Nancy from Honolulu First two books were gripping.
I am halfway into the third book and am finding it hard going, and I am a forgiving reader.
Far too many subplots going on with too many unsympathetic characters without a central unifying concept.
I will slog through, but I am finding myself taking digressions to read entirely different books, just to get a break.
This is a big change, as I read through the first two books over a long weekend - completely enthralled.
Kyle from Vancouver It's funny reading through all the reviews, the majority of tens come from people who've read only book 1, or book 1 and 2.
Those were great books, great character development.
But as many people here point out, as the series goes on, GRRM's reticence to conclude a single damn subplot much less a plotline, while opting instead to introduce endless new characters dilutes the overall narative as he is no longer able to do any one storyline or character justice.
The new characters don't get much development at all.
It's a shaggy dog story.
I'd give 8 or 9 stars to the first 2 books - but the series over all I'd say 4.
He's totally wandered off and does not seem likely to return, so I shall do the same.
Now, I'm going to go see what this Steve Erikson everyone mentions is all about.
George from Toronto This story is the best ever written in any genre, period.
The first book is a wonder, the second is as good, and the third is best in the series.
I agree, the fourth and fifth aren't my favourites.
But they're still above-average.
I can't wait to see how the story concludes -- Martin is planning a total of 7 books.
I read some of the negative reviews.
The ones who are negative put right in their review that they skipped chapters.
Martin is a genius story teller, he didn't write 1,000 pages for his health.
It was for a purpose.
If you skip a chapter, how on earth can you complain if the rest of the story stops making sense?
The man is a God.
I read Erikson, Tolkien, Rothfuss, Hemmingway, and also crap like the Hunger Games.
Martin's story is 1 by a significant margin.
Hanna from USA I am not a book "reviewer" however, I was drawn into this series after I saw the HBO mini series "A Game of Thrones".
I read through the first 3 books anticipating what all the ground work Martin has laid to mean.
I can't finish it!
Nothing has come from the ground work that was laid in the first 3 books.
Main charaters are killed off for no apparent reason.
I feel like I am reading in circles and nothing is being resolved and nothing meant anything in the first 3 books.

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Martin creates a medieval fantasy world that is nearly overwhelmingly the rating game book in detail.
He aims to provide a more "realistic" kind of saga, upending clichés and providing viewpoints of unusual characters.
Tradition is important, and promises should be kept.
It's better to free da code download a problem head-on than to deny that you're in trouble.
In A Game of Thrones and its sequels, author George R.
Martin rarely shows only one side of his characters' personalities.
Few of them are all good or all bad.
He clearly sympathizes with the members of the Stark family, but the rating game book of them is also capable of accessing a dark side.
From its first scene to its last, A Game of Thrones contains violence, which often strikes without warning to the guilty and the innocent alike.
There are beheadings, sword fights, wolf attacks, rapes, and death by molten gold.
A young boy is thrown out a window.
No character is ever safe, and the graphic details of their injuries or deaths are usually provided.
Although not as prevalent as violence, sex plays a large part in A Game of Thrones and its please click for source the rating game book and Jaime Lannister engage in an incestuous relationship.
Tyrion falls in love with a courtesan.
Barely in her teens, Daenerys Targaryen enters into a sexual relationship with an older man before marrying him and becoming pregnant with his child.
Sometimes such encounters are described in graphic detail.
Think of a swear word, and it's probably used in A Song of Fire and Ice at some point, from "damn" and "bastard" to "c--t" and "f--k.
Set in a magical version of the Middle Ages, it chronicles the exploits of the Stark, Baratheon, Lannister, and Targaryen families as they struggle for power in a deadly civil war.
Violence percolates through nearly every scene, including sword fights, beheadings, rapes, wolf attacks, death by molten gold, and more.
Sexual content includes an incestuous relationship between a brother and a sister, the marriage of an older man to a teen girl, and a prince's love affair with a courtesan.
The language is predictably rough, ranging from "hell" and "damn" to "f--k" and "c--t.
This book series is the best book series in the whole world, it is a bit graphic though, the most graphic book of ra game about it is the violence and language.
I'm 14 and reading Game Of Thrones.
People say it's got too much sex and violence even for teens, more info I think it depends on the kid's maturity le.
After his predecessor is murdered, Eddard Stark reluctantly agrees to serve as "the Hand" to his ariel book maker game friend, King Robert Baratheon.
His honorable decision has far-reaching consequences for his family.
After King Robert dies, the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros are plunged into civil war, thanks to the plotting of the Lannisters, and the Stark children and their mother are scattered in all directions.
Each must find a new way to survive in a rapidly changing world, even as magic grows stronger, a new peril approaches the Wall that protects the kingdoms, and the threat of the ultimate weapon -- tame dragons -- grows in the East.
There have been many fantasy sagas published in the last half century, but few can boast the scope, depth, and attention to detail of A SONG OF FIRE AND ICE.
Some of the first five volumes work better than others A Feast for Crows leaves many readers disappointedbut all add new elements that only increase the complex richness of the narrative.
This book series is certainly not for sensitive readers.
The language is rough, the violence is brutal, and the sexual content sometimes veers into the perverse including brother-sister incest.
But readers with the maturity to handle adult material will be amply rewarded.
Martin is a serious storyteller of the first order, and A Song of Fire and Ice is his masterwork.
What aspects of them appeal most to readers and viewers?
Does it add a sense of realism to emotionally charged situations?
Would some of the characters be better off if they had not resorted to violence so quickly?
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What age should read this book. ratings to this book then I'd give it an R rating and the show would be NC-17.. going to pick up a Game of Thrones book just to.


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2 Book #2: A Clash of Kings. The second book in the Game of Thrones book order, A Clash of Kings delivers on the titles promise. A bleeding star causes differing cultures to believe alternate prophecies are being fulfilled, leading to five separate kings clashing for power.


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As warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robert bestows on him the office of the Hand.
His honour weighs him down at court where a true man does what he will, not what he must.
The old gods have no power in the south, Stark's family is split and there is treachery at court.
Worse, a vengeance mad boy has grown to maturity in exile in the Free Cities beyong the sea.
Heir of the mad Dragon King deposed by Robert, he claims the Iron Throne.
Ever since my entry into the heady and wonderful peaks of fantasy literature following the release of the Fellowship of the Ring movie in 2001, I have been hard pressed to find an author greater than the inimitable J.
But both authors have fallen short of the sheer scope that Tolkien envisioned and, successfully, created.
Since then, I have only come across two authors who have come close to envisioning and successfully carrying out their literary creations to match Tolkien; Steven Erikson and George R.
Some authors try, and fail miserably.
For Martin though, in scope, creativity, and writing ability, A Song of Ice and Fire is everything you want in an epic fantasy tale.
Set in a world very akin to our own medieval history, specifically the English War of the Roses, A Game of Thrones introduces us to one of the greatest and largest character lists around.
The story is told from eight perspectives.
Each perspective is held within a chapter which, when the characters move away from each other, allows the author to continually leave minor cliff-hangers at the end of each chapter.
While six of the characters from this first book are from the same family, the perspective is shifted around in preceding books.
Death is commonplace, almost to the point of horror, but conducted in such a way that it, sadly, reminds us of our own bloody histories.
Martin does not shy away from the death, rape and plunder that would have been norm for the setting and in doing so provides a much more complete story.
Mindless destruction is often the cause for character splits and confrontations, and by the end of the book characters you assumed you would be attached too for some time are left headless, gutless or simply gone.
Throughout the entire series Martin focuses almost primarily upon one continent.
However there is one character, Daenerys Targaryen, who has been forced to flee to a separate continent as a young girl.
At first I remember feeling disorientated and a little slighted at seemingly being provided this perspective which seemed nothing short of pointless.
However as I have continued to read, she has become one of my favourite characters.
Dense to the point of labour, but captivating well past my bed time, Martin knows exactly where to draw the line between lots of information and tedious boredom.
Joshua S Hill The novel, A Game of Thrones, begins with an encounter with supernatural beings; this may give a false impression as to what will come.
As the story begins to unfold, the theme moves strongly into the area of political intrigue and this forthcoming war that will happen as a result.
The fantasy element, while always there plays only a minor role in the majority of the rest of the book.
A Game of Thrones in not your usual fare, it is hard-hitting and bad things do happen to the good people.
Two families take centre stage in a battle for the Throne; the Starks and the Lannisters.
The Stark family live in the cold hard North, Winterfell is the seat of their domain.
We are, using chapters headlined with the family names, introduced to the Stark family.
King Robert is married to a Lannister, Queen Cersei.
He is accompanied there by Tyrion Lannister, a dwarf.
Although they do not become friends they end up with a grudging respect for each other.
Then, suddenly one day, the King is killed hunting wild boar and Eddard and the Lannister are drawn into a battle for the throne.
Finally, at the end, the fantasy element once again returns and we are left looking forward to the second instalment.
This is a very good novel, full of twists and turns.
It leaves you wanting more and move on to A Clash of Kings.
It's ambition: to construct the Twelve Caesars of fantasy fiction, with characters so venemous they could eat the Borgais.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 1 9.
Winter can last a lifetime.
And the struggle for the Iron Throne has begun.
As Warden of the north, Lord Eddard Stark counts it a curse when King Robe.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 2 9.
From the ancient citadel of Dragonstone to the forbidding lands of Winterfell, chaos reigns as pretenders to the Iron T.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 3 9.
The Seven Kingdoms are divided by revolt and blood feud as winter approaches like an angry beast.
In the northern wastes a horde of hungry, sav.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 3 9.
Robb Stark may be King in the North, but he must bend to the will of the old tyrant Walder Frey if he is to hold his crown.
And while his youngest.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 4 7.
The war in the Seven Kingdoms has burned itself out, but in its bitter aftermath new conflicts spark to life.
A Song of Ice and Fire: Book 5 8.
In the east, Daener.
Have you read A Game Of Thrones?
We've found that while readers like to know what we think of a book they find additional reader reviews a massive help in deciding if it is the right book for them.
So if you have a spare moment, please tell us your thoughts by writing a reader's review.
Eric from America This is a great book.
I enjoy the brutal realism of the characters and the world that Martin has built.
McIntosh from USA How are they considering Game of Thrones high fantasy?
It seems like the perfect example for low fantasy to me.
Most of the show revolves around politics and wars, and magic isn't a normal part of everyday life.
Brecken from USA There are no books I love more than the A Song of Ice and Fire.
Honestly, it deserves so much better than a 9.
I almost exclusively read fantasy and these books are as good as lord of the rings, in a different way a very different way.
The best thing is they are all about character.
In fantasy, characterization is often put to the side so that cool battles and fun magic can be explored more.
There are only two characters in the entire series that I know are the bad guys, and the author even has me feeling bad for them at some points.
Every character feels real, and there are moments where I have hated every one of them, and moments where I have loved them.
They all develop over time in ways that you can barely notice until it hits you that, wow, that character isn't evil anymore.
There are a million plot lines, and each one is very real.
No one cheats, no one can "just do the magic thing" to get out of a situation.
Our favorite characters die, and the bad ones get to live.
It is extremely well written, fast paced in some places and slow in others.
The books have a depth that make you want to read the series over and over again so you can find out just what is going on with the characters, and catch all of the hints and symbolism the author puts in there.
I will never look at fantasy the same again, this series has changed my world view.
Mike from Canada The first book was very entertaining and Ned's death was actually shocking.
I sat there thinking about all that could come from this series.
Yeah some of the writing was ham fisted, who am I to judge, but the plot was like one of those Rockwood Gardnes trees with plums, peaches, cherries and apples all on the same tree.
Lots of low hanging fruit to pick from.
Hey we got these giant hybrid wolves, maybe shapeshifters, telepathy, dragons, ghasts, magic, assassins, and lots more.
Yes there are barbarians in the north and its cliche, but that can work.
Political intrigue of england.
And we have somewhat good and bad guys.
Great start aaaaand then the wheels fall off.
Instead of using some of the fruit he just letting fall off the tree to rot.
Instead we are given lists of crap we don't need to care about.
What type of fowl they are eating, the sauce, where the sauce is from, where the fowl is from, who is eating it.
OH yeah this 3rd Bannerman for the house of Mooreevilish is wearing a turquoise tunic fashioned from the twill of far off Neargoodshire where small puppies are strung up and hit like pinatas but makes them less evil than their neighbour who does it with live babies in Babybashinworth, though Babybashingworth is known for their exquisite soup made from infant brains served in a fusia bowl decorated in intricate gold filigree and a soup spoon fashioned from the eyesocket of the dogs in Neargoodshire, painted a vermillion redly.
See what happens when you aren't concise.
You will never see that bannerman again, the meal has no plot meaning, nore does the origin of the tunic if it doesn't have any consequence later on.
Scene one shotgun on mantle, better use that things sometime during your performance or it shouldn't be there.
A good editor would have made this a lot better.
By book 3 I was still waiting on things I knew where not coming.
I gave up in book opinion free game books of ra curious because I had done 8 books of Jordan and decided to never waste my time on a series that just sits around.
Yes he kills characters, but it becomes trivial when it happens so often.
Yes and this is novel where the rating game book are suppose to bond with characters, not feel like some lofty king who rolls over a beggar in your grand caravan.
Little growth that is meaningful because that character will of course die, plot that just seems to go in a circle, prose that aren't good.
Yes 1 star is harsh, but jebus this could have been so much better.
Book one left enough there to make 5 good series and he couldn't make one in the 5000 pages written so far.
Kath from England Takes a while to read and some parts are slow but the storyline is amazing and I highly recommend.
Poppia from China I have to say, I wonder, how you people could even get through the first page.
I had to read it, because everybody was recommending it.
It's all because of the language.
Seriously, how could people even suffer it?!
What the fuck is "Will had known that they will drag him into the quarrel sooner or later, and he wished it would have been later rather than sooner"???
And what the fuck is "slender as a knife"???
And what the fuck is "he studied that deepening twilight in that half-bored, half-distracted way he had"???
I know popular books are supposed to be easy to read, but this?!
Even grade school kids write way much better, and coherent.
Despite really wanting to read it because I want to find out what is going on and what everybody is talking about in this serieI can't read it, I just can't.
I have no idea why this ever got published.
So, i don't recommend you to read it.
It ruins your linguistic skills.
And it ruins your abilities to write and even talk normally.
Corin from United Kingdom This series is very simplistic for fantasy.
The world is empty, no magic systemno real variation between factions or originality.
Characters all behave the same way.
No explanation or balance which amount to childlike world building.
Where are the normal people, they're all Lords or Knights.
The battles are ridiculous, far too many deaths, no tactics and no war machines of any sort.
Really, what are the chances of Gilly not getting raped at Castle black, slim to none.
Sam would've been raped!
Put a woman in maximum security prison and see what happens.
Violent and miserable does not equal realistic!
TV series is brilliant but not a fair representation of the books.
Donald from US The first three books I would give a "7".
Books 4 and 5 get a 2.
The first three books were page turners, though still flawed.
As others have said, his realism sheds over into sadism at times.
And then there is the overuse of phony cliffhangers-- for instance, we are told Arya is hit on the head by an ax swung by ra book besplatne of igre casino man on horseback and many pages later we find it was only the flat of the ax and so she survived.
Highly unlikely, but aside from that, cheap storytelling.
The TV series has some of the same flaws, but improves on the books by removing some of these idiotic cliffhangers.
And the characters are frankly more human.
Shae, for instance, is a cliched " bad" prostitute in the books.
She is a real human being in the show.
Despite their flaws, the first three books were real page turners for me.
Books 4 and 5 were mostly dreary.
Many of the most interesting characters, good and bad and yes, the distinction is clear have been killed off, only to be replaced by new characters who are simply not that engaging.
Seasons 5 and 6 on TV have been justly criticized, but there are at least some truly exciting episodes and some moderately entertaining dialogue even in the slower episodes.
I have rewatched them all.
I have zero interest in ever rereading Martin's books, because the last two have been so bad.
I don't really care if he ever finishes the series.
For me, the TV series, flawed as it is, is the real story as far as I am concerned.
Martin created an immensely fascinating world, but he badly needed an editor who could stand up to him.
Gabriele from Italy Overated books.
Childish and false "European middle age" from low quality school books.
A Must NOT Read.
Worst is the fans, they say that Lord of the Rings is for kids, REALLY?!
This book wad've been good if it divint' have the sex!!!
Lawrence von Kyleman from Prussia HBO show is far superior to the books simply because it seems as though Martin always intended for his series to be made into a visual form.
How else do you explain the long drawn out descriptions of small inconsequential bull which is so frequently used.
I can't imagine how the narrators for the audio-books could keep themselves from falling asleep.
I bet editing and adapting this drivel for TV must be a pain though.
I imagine the writers pouring over the books cutting out the descriptions of stupid crud, useless subplots, and fixing this fat dbags overall bland and plot-hole ridden narrative.
I'd geuss they use about 40% of the source material in the show after that.
I think HBO did an amazing job with this show, and I wish they came up with it themselves so they didn't have to pay some lazy, fat, old man to go through his thousands of pages worth of vapid, drawn-out, poorly executed, novels laden with what I can only assume are his sexual fantasies.
Sundar from Lal This book, and the other books published of the series, are as read more and amazing piece of literature.
The characters in the story are superb.
I read these book and absolutely had to recommend them to every book buddy.
Decimus from Canada Some people believe that it is justifiable write reviews for the entire series on the page for the first book.
I personally find it interesting, as though many people decided that they would attempt to warn others of the series inevitable decline in the reviews of the first book.
I would have to agree with this line of thinking sadly enough as, like many others I find that the series is excellent at first with many strong points to be found in the first few books, however the strength of the plot wanes once the fourth book starts, and the quality of the books becomes more diluted once the fifth is reached.
The series can still be saved, but with no release date as of yet for the sixth book, with the seventh and final volume most likely being another five to six years after.
The more dedicated fans will be forced to wait in quiet agony hoping Martin does not pass away before the ending is finished.
As far as the problems I have with the books, I will try to keep them short and simple for the purpose of the review.
First, the people who we are supposed to sympathize with Starks are all morons.
Eddard is a moron for announcing his intentions to Cersei, Robb and Catelyn are morons for siding with Renly over Stannis the rightful king and going to the home of a man known to break oaths.
Finally, the use of Deus ex Machina, its everywhere.
In short I like the books enough for what they are but the issues I have with the characters and inclusion of poorly written Deus ex Machina story coincidences is too great to ignore.
Bruno from Brazil I would just like to say that I really wanted to like this book.
I read about 500 pages and the story moves forward at such a slow pace that I couldn't bother reading further.
Every event feels like an obvious plot device, there is no culture, characters have no personality and no charisma whatsoever, there are too many storylines happening at the same time and none of them are in the least interesting, because the novel is structured in a way that when you start developing the slightest bit of sympathy towards a certain character the author ends the chapter, and the next chapter focuses on a completely different story arc with a different set of characters, much like the scenes in a soap opera.
There's no fantasy in this first volume of GoT except for dragon eggs, zombies, and swords with hilarious names.
Don't waste your time on this.
Peter from Netherlands Perhaps the literary con-job of the century.
Mediocre unoriginal writing that sets up a myriad of random story lines and finishes none.
Many people mistake this lazy haphazardly way of writing with the world being rich and the characters realistic, but is simply is a cheap trick invoked by a writer who probably has no idea how he's going to wrap everything up properly, not that this is a problem for him in the future.
I find it amazing how this parlor trick convinced so many people to run with this drivel, but that's the internet age for you.
Perhaps that is why he dislikes fanfic so much, knowing that his pulp isn't that far above the average slash nonsense.
If you want mindless entertainment, see the show and read a good book, not this MacDonalds fantasy wannabe.
Jarek from Usa I would like to start by saying that the fanboys ruined the series for me.
You know who I am talking about.
The people who belive that the books are absolutely perfect and the author is a god among men who we shall bow down to.
As for the books, I find that click start off fine, but somewhere down the line I believe that Martin has too much to focus on due to multiple characters and storylines needing to be written across varied locations spanning continents.
There really is too much to focus on for any writer, but then add in the obsessive amount of detail and its no wonder the books lose quality as they go on.
I believe what Martin should have done is kept things simple, one characters point of view and get straight into winter rather than letting the main issue wait for 5 books at 1000+ pages per book.
It really is more like we got to a party too soon while the decorations are still being set up for the main event.
The books are mediocre at best, I believe that a vast majority of the people who claim to be fans of this series only read it because of the show and were sorely disapointed.
Mike from South Wales Maybe you have to be a certain type to enjoy this particular genre of book?
It certainly did nothing whatsoever for me.
I book of slot trick that if the first ten pages or so do not grab my attention then that is it.
This was certainly the case with Game of Thrones.
Sorry but I just do not see the attraction.
It was the most boring, long drawn out 4 chapters that I have ever read in my life and I will not be attempting to read anymore of it.
Erik from Germany I have a few problems with these books, first is the borderline obsessive detail, the amount of detail GRRM puts into these books prohibits you from seeing the world as you want to see it and limits you to the author's view.
The main problem for me however, is the multiple characters I do not care about at all.
So far after 5 books, only three really interest me, Tyrion, Jon, and Daenerys.
I really do not care what happens to anyone else at all.
The rest of the Starks and Lannisters could visit web page each other off for all I care.
At this point I just read the chapters concerning those three and read summaries for everyone else.
Rebekah from New Zealand This thick, material crammed book is written so brilliantly that it is impossible for one to get bored whilst reading.
I enjoy the fact that everyone is somehow connected in the story, no matter how far away they all seem from each other.
What additionally made this novel awesome was that at each end of chapters, GRRM would leave a cliff-hangar, forcing you to read on till it's 3:34 on a school morning.
Ron from Canada Reading this series has been just slowly watching anyone with any sort of morals die off.
It grows very tiresome very fast, at this point nothing could get me to continue reading what has become a series devoid of any characters I can sympathize with.
I'll read a synopsis when it ends just so I know how GRRM will finally kill this series.
Of course part of me also wishes GRRM will samsung new z1 games before he finishes so the people who think this series is better than Tolkien's work will never get an ending.
Ewan from Scotland This book was the first book I finished on my own and not being forced English in school.
This book is so good that it made me, click who would never even try a book.
Get into reading, you know it's good.
Toland from Scotland This is really the only series I will never bother to finish.
After reading through the first few books of this supposedly fantasy series I have to wonder where the fantasy is.
All I found was some bs about winter coming which wore down my patience so fast along with the overdone descriptions.
I believe at this point the success of the books more or less piggyback on the accesability of visit web page tv show.
This is the only explanation I can find for the series success.
Victor from Canada I suppose that today's popularity of this book series comes directly from the HBO show.
The popularity of this TV show, on its part, comes from the realities that there are not many "medieval - fantasy" type of shows on today's television.
Therefore, when you don't have enough fish in the lake, every more or less decent crucian would be considered to be a local whale and a shark altogether.
The book is overrated.
The narration is flat and colorblind.
The monologues are emotionless and, for the most part, don't carry any story-progressing load on them.
The description of decorations, clothing and little details is pretty often redundant and used just to eat more pages that readers paid for, especially in the latest books.
Author uses his very first book to set up the chess pieces and intrigue the reader, but it is hard to distinguish when if the game actually starts, and while the reader is making his attempt to figure that out, some main characters are already dead, others have fallen away from the story line and don't play any part in it.
The only three stars I give are for the fist book, because initially it looked promising.
I don't know what percentage of HBO's profit goes into Martin's pocket, but the truth is, Martin should be the one who is paying HBO for forcing his luck of talent going mainstream.
Joe from USA I made it to only slightly more than halfway through Book 1.
It is the only novel I can ever remember not finishing.
Matteo from Italy Not really a novel, rather a soap opera screenplay for sex-dreaming male kids with a taste for the shallow and the boring.
Also, a very good business for the author.
Infesting, as parasite vines.
Avoid at all cost.
Alice from England I will give it just over half stars, purely because I think that the concept is brilliant, and the series begins very strongly, with the first book in particular being excellent.
However, sadly, what could have been an explosive series slowly dissolved into an anti climax with absolutely nothing happening.
Book one, and most of book two are very good, book three has some interesting parts, although admittantly it begins to loose structure, book four however, I struggled with despite flying through the preceding books and I gave up on book five.
It seems that the interesting characters that Martin established in the first book have either been killed off or their storylines have dried out and have subsequently been replaced with much less the rating game book characters and storylines.
All in all, the disappointment factor when reflecting upon what this story could have been is perhaps the worst thing about it.
It could have been great, and it has its moments, but when you look at the potential that Martin had to begin with, which slowly dissolves into nothing, it's just such a shame that he couldn't carry it out and that's the worst thing about the series, the dreadful waste of potential.
Still, I wouldn't say avoid it completely, just be aware that this story will probably not play out the way you had hoped and you may well find yourself as disappointed as I was.
Alex from Greece I absolutely loved it, the whole idea, the writting style.
I do not get why everyone disses that "Dance with Dragons" fifth book though.
I found it quite interesting.
Maria from US "Six" as a rating is deceptive.
I gave 10 to the first three books, and single stars to the last two books, and 6-7 is what I got.
Sadly, the last two books take all the momentum of the first three, and flush it down the toilet.
I wish they didn't.
I'm waiting for book six, and hoping that Martin gets his act together, but at this point the story is so bloated that it's unlikely to happen.
If anyone wants an excellent series that moves like a well-oiled machine from start to finish, try Joe Abercrombie's First Law trilogy.
However gradually this 'epic' seems to loose all momentum and direction, it is when you begin to realize that there are entire chapters in the book that you do not care about, entire chapters that are so mind numbingly dull and uninsightful, that you could happily skip them.
Words become words, everything takes so long, too long to arrive at a destination.
The most visit web page stories seem to end abruptly or with an inadequate solution and you begin to notice that the more words that are written the more the books loose all sense of direction, you become unattached from all characters and stories and its a shame because the world which has been created is sublime, however the way in which this 'epic' is told just does not do justice to the first two books and the direction it was originally heading in.
Kate from UK Half way through book 5 ' A Dance with Dragons' and losing the will to live.
On the back of the TV series the first two books were enjoyable enough with sympathetic characters and some genuine boo hiss baddies to hate but by book 4 we were flagging and book 5 is simply dreadful.
Self indulgent repetitive and pointless.
Dany continues to play the stroppy teenager before finally getting laid having dumped her dragons in a pit on noticing they aren't house-trained.
Martin clearly doesn't care about his characters so how can we?
So utterly disdainful is he of his readers that he ends his books with a self pitying winge about what a bitch it all has been for him to write.
Well not nearly as big a bitch as it was to lay out good money then waste hours of our lives reading this self indulgent piffle mate.
Wayne from US Awesome book, enticing read.
Love the series and people complaining how it's poorly written.
This is really a great series, not a single one of you could even come close to matching Martin's writing.
Mamushet from Washington DC I would have to say that the world GRRM created is interesting.
But the series is over extended and loses its appeal after the first two books.
The fourth and fifth books are filled with repetitions and tedious details.
The book starts by building some anticipation for the arrival of winter yet you will have to read five books to get there.
It is like watching 15 min boring commercial for 2 min show.
Greblixx from Germany Avoid this mediocre book.
It's more than loss of time.
It's a nonsensical mess.
Book 4 and 5 have absolutely nothing to say and all the characters are primitive.
It seems that the author just wants to set a record of number of pages lacking of any substance.
Jayne from United States For a while, I've been trying to figure out how I feel about these books I've read all 5.
They're a deviation from the traditional fantasy storyline hero that overcomes all vs.
I do think he does it well, the story is well written and always keeps you guessing.
I didn't have a problem with the multiple characters and their separate chapters I made it through the Wheel of Time series and loved it https://filmman.ru/book/giochi-slot-gratis-book-of-ra.html, but I did have a problem with caring what happens.
I like that Mr.
Martin has no qualms about killing off whatever character needed to die and the revolving complexity of the plot is really interesting.
But honestly, what I think he lost between the multiple characters and their impermanence was making me care about the character.
I think he shows their negative sides much more than any goodness in them and in not knowing how long they're going to be around, I found myself avoiding getting too emotionally involved in their stories to the point that I just don't really care what happens to them anymore.
I also agree with another reviewer here in that somewhere the overall plot gets lost.
Also I'm just confused about the role of the whole "winter is coming" idea - I would like to see that come to more prominence because I could see that forcing everyone to set aside their differences and their petty politics to fight a common foe - and it's seemed like that since the very first chapter.
Overall, I say kudos to Mr.
Martin for daring to break the traditional fantasy conventions and hopefully opening a whole new realm of possibilities for other writers but I hope that after this series, he learns from his mistakes and writes a much better one.
I give it 6 stars for boldness, creativity, interesting characters and good writing.
Nobody from USA Wow, you are comparing Martin to Tolkien?
If I could pick a fantasy author to recommend to someone looking for something to equal or best Tolkien's LoTR, it would have to be Gene Wolfe, and the Urth series.
Phil from US Book 1, good -- Book 2, OK --- Book 3, hoping something happens that doesn't waste Book 1.
Book 4, didn't finish, no ending could be worth the bother.
I've read "War and Peace", Gibbon's "Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" twiceSelby Foote's "The Civil War", the Literary Digest's "History of the World War" WWI, all ten volumes ; I even took a crack at the Encyclopedia Britannica when I was 12 and home sick for a month.
I've read some part of a book every day for over 50 years, since I was able to read anything.
And never, ever have I abandon a book in mid-stream not even Joyce's "Ulysses" or even James' "The Learn more here Bowl", which, while brilliant are a slog for a modern read article />It's bloated, filled with characters no one can care about, and too many points of view.
The only way to end this series is to kill off nearly everyone and since there are so many characters the reader can hardly care.
As Stalin is reputed to have said, "one death is a tragedy, a million deaths are a statistic.
Felix from America An absoloutely brilliant novel.
In my opinion, A Game of Thrones is one of the greatest fantasy novels ever written by one of the best authors ever.
George RR Martin is able to capture emotions and build suspense and leaves you wanting more.
A truly great novel.
Jake from Australia To all the haters, you're entitled to your opinion.
I like to recall the story of how the producers of the TV show read a part of the first book and were immediately overwhelmed, impressed, taken by the imagery, the ambience, the sense of place and the characters.
So, at least 2 people in the world were touched by the book.
Now that's 2 more than a lot of other writers.
Cristoff from Australia Too long winded, too much focus on tedious details.
The basic Premise for the novels is good in my opinion, But really needed to be written by someone like J.
Rowling who knows how to filter out Blab.
The second half of the third book is the most interesting to read while the whole fourth book made me want to scure my eye balls with a hot iron poker.
Yngvar from Norway I have been going through books 1-4 now, and I must say that I sometimes could not get off the book, it's exciting.
But many other times I really relent starting a new chapter, especially when I see that the chapter title is "Sansa" or "Catelyn".
There are way too much text in which nothing ever happens, nor the monolouge is interesting.
Worst of all is the vast number of too-long descriptions of what people are wearing!
Or how things look!
Got damnit, that's so uninteresting!
Anthony from UK To those who say the writing isn't good, I challenge you to write at Martin's level.
The different pespectives add depth to the story but I understand that some people might have trouble understanding.
I wish to note that in no mean I judge the series alltogether.
Martin have created an interesting world with lots of likeable charachters, epic story and unique in a sense playing with reader.
The problem I have is that it's boring.
No, not the story, however overdone and simple, but the narrative.
Never have I reade such flat descriptions and emotionless dialouge, not to mention forced expositions.
Honestlythe idea of charachter perspective told story with each chapter being presented from pov of different one involved in an event is nice, the execution is less than impressive.
If not for the HBO show I would have hard time getting into the presented world.
Another thing are all the Deus Ex Machina literaly forcing the plot to continue the intended way.
HBO patches some holes, adds here, takes away there and makes the story overall better and of course.
Puts life into the charachters and dialogue!
I hope the other books of the series are better because so far my jaw hurts from yawning.
Darren from Manchester I can only really use two words to rate this book you can apply the same two words to the entire series to be truthful - Over Rated.
I have seen people rate this alongside Tolkien or Ursula Le Guin, Martin couldn't and doesn't hold a candle to those writers nor about 10 others whom are far superior.
Try reading the Mistborn Series Brandon Sanderson or Malazan Series Steven Erikson and then re-assess Martin, I will guarantee you opinion will have changed : Andrew from USA Game of Thorns is a good book, but it is intro to a bad series.
I have many gripes for the book but the biggest and most important one is the singular fault with Eddard Stark.
That being when he learns of what the Queen has done.
Eddard to this point in the book the whole book almost has done the "right thing" no matter how much it hurts himself, family, anyone.
At the finally moment when doing the "right thing" would mean justice for his family and protect his family, he doesn't do it.
Instead he makes an offer with the Queen instead of exposing her.
Martin had a good book and a good beginning to a series until that moment.
It went downhill from there, and really is just unreadable.
Gordon from Oklahoma, USA A Game of Thrones, and the rest of the Fire and Ice series, are the finest stories I have read in many years, and I am a prolific reader who enjoys many different categories of literature.
After having read Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy as well as the Hobbit a few years ago while the Peter Jackson movies were being progressively released, I am of the opinion that "A Game of Thrones" and the entire Fire and Ice series to this point are several steps above anything Tolkien ever wrote.
An added bonus is the result of HBO is doing a great job of bringing the Fire and Ice books to the homes of people who would never consider picking up a the rating game book page novel.
Anybody who bothers to read each of the books from both writers can count themselves lucky to be able to enjoy such well written literature.
For those who have seen the HBO series and enjoyed it so far, you should read A Game of Thrones and decide for yourself if the written material is superior to the theatrical release.
I would also put this series above the Harry Potter books and movies.
Emily from England Read it because of the series on television and am not ashamed.
It the rating game book include adult scenes, which I thought fitted the atmosphere of the novel and I am a teenager, so it is understandable I would find them more awkward.
You can't complain about not understanding the novel if you don't read all of it, including the 'boring' parts.
All the Tolkien lovers need to broaden their horizons.
GRRM isn't trying to be Tolkien, he's an epic writer on his own with his own style.
Kah from Brazil This is modernity, I guess.
The way of narrating a story has certainly changed.
Things are about discourse and action, now.
This is a great epic which is providing nice adaptations.
Of course, the plot is very long and, because of this, its quality oscilates sometimes.
I myself didn't like the fourth book the first three books were an amazing experience and the fifth has been little playful.
But this is not about comparing G.
M to Tolkien or Lewis.
This is about accepting what this generation is producing and understand it withouth making anacronisms.
Highfantasy from Pakistan I have few complaints: The books are filled with far too many subplots, characters and POVs.
I wonder why add them when Martin has to kill and burn everything, I found this practice to be rather masochistic, reminiscent of Peakes' Gormenghast trilogy.
How much detail is enough and how many time does he has to repeat them?
For instance Old Bear's Raven sitting on his shoulder and repeats last word of every sentence he says and he is awarded with corn, Ghost is warm, Bran is crippled, Catelyn is a women, Sansa is a complete fool, Davos has moving his finger less hand and Danerys deserves a slap.
I liked the story but it's way too long and tiresome to read, endless and repetitive details ruined it.
I cannot get past the third book.
Thomas from England I would like to point out that the book being reviewed is Game Of Thrones, not the whole series, A Song Of Ice And Fire, which many people seem to be forgetting.
M from USA Utter crap.
To compare this to Tolkien WHO CREATED THE MODERN FANTASY GENRE is inexcusable and ignorant.
Typical of most modern entertainment, it is nothing more than a writer's endless quest for cash and fame.
Sadly after 3 decades as a fan of the fantasy genre I have stopped reading fantasy novels as the genre like so many other things in this modern world have been cheapened and turned to crap.
To all those people who love reality TV.
Eric Showatt from Australia People seem to think the reason why the opinion about this series is so divided because the way the author kills off the character and the amount of angst, miseries this series content.
While this may seem like a plausible reason, the real reason is actually far more simple.
Game of Thrones sucks.
Now I'm not here to troll or bash the author - I'm here to review this series honestly.
There is no doubt in my mind that GRRM is one of the most prolific writer of our time.
His world building ability is on par with Tolkien, and the character he has created are very realistic and interesting.
One can almost read Game of throne like an alternative history if we forget all the magical element within the story.
The political motivation of each character are very well defined and the consequences for failure in this series are heavy - you are lucky if you managed to die a clean death, as is the case with Ned Stark.
He died, sure, but there are many character who ended up wishing they were dead but couldn't quite manage it because their can kiit date slot booking agree prevent them from doing so.
There is beauty in this book.
Beauty in the finality of death and the cruelty of living.
I would like to ask every reviewer and every reader of Game of Thrones, what is the actual plot of this series?
Lots of things happen, sure.
You get loads and loads of characters.
Each of them have their own arc.
Some gets killed off, some don't, but are any of them truly relevant?
Just consider this for a second and you will see what an appalling story the series is - it's not actually a story.
It's many story woven into one book, like a game that contains several character sheet and no main plot whatsoever.
Things unfold, but it's just things that happens.
If I were to describe what this story is about, I would simply say "It's a book about a bunch read article things that happened in a land called Westeros", and that's pretty much what the series has become by the end of the third book.
Now I will go on to say that the first book is simply breath taking.
There is actually a plot, and the characters pov are consistent and - most importantly - relevant.
You get the honorable idiot Ned Stark who is trying to figure out why Jon Arryn was killed, while his wife and kids are trying to figure out who pushed Bran off the balcony.
The two conspiracies tied together, because what Bran witnessed was the key to Ned Stark's hunt for the reason why Jon Arryn is killed and why books slots is becoming involved in the first place.
The subplot with Dany?
That's just the icing on the cake, like something that you can either read or ignore completely.
The tradition continues on to the second book, after Ned stark's tragedy, the land is divided and the war happens.
We see the brutal aftermath, we see the people fighting for the Iron Throne.
While the plot began to dwindle after the first book, the characters are presented with one goal - that is to fight for the Iron Throne, with a subplot of getting their loved ones back to safety.
However, after the third book everything went downhill.
The war is more or less resolved.
The winner and losers are already evident.
Major character are killed off, new ones are introduced but none of them are coherent anymore.
Everything literally becomes "just shit that happens", and the entire series has become a wait for "something to happen".
And that's why the series has become such a disappointment in so many eyes.
If anyone has to ball to say GRRM can't write for a damn, they have no business in writing or creative industry in general.
However, if anyone says reading A Song of Ice and Fire is becoming increasingly pointless, then you have my sympathy.
I've no doubt that things are going to change now that Dany and Tyrion is coming back to the mainland to reclaim their home, but as it stands today, Game of Thrones is a massive disappointment that has a strong beginning but poorly executed plot throughout the middle.
Chris from Scotland Having just ploughed through the final published book in the series to date, I can only echo all of the sentiments previously expressed by some of the more erudite reviewers and I definitely fall into "the don't waste your time camp".
I did enjoyed the first HBO series in a superficial way but was disappointed with series 2.
Talk about milking it, I for one won't be giving the man who reminds me of a character in Lord of The Rings any more of my hard earned dosh.
Manpreet from India This book is full of all the emotions and elements; this book is a journey full of violence, treachery, loyalty honesty, love, families, romance, conspiracies, back stabbing and much more.
I have read The Lord of the Rings, and I am not adverse to very long series The Wheel of Time is still going and I have no qualms with thatbut Game of Thrones is SO overrated I can scarcely believe it.
The first three books are alright.
Minus a few incredibly laughable and cringey sex scenes and some truly awful characters there are a few interesting scenes one every fifty pages maybe.
I bought them and I do not feel like it was a complete waste of time, but really I do not feel like I have read something exceptional, just an average book, the kind that I have read once and will probably forget after a few years.
The fourth book however.
I can honestly say I have never found a story so dull.
The action is sporadic at best, and dispersed so thinly between sections equivalent to three smaller novels that it really did not feel worth searching for them.
The https://filmman.ru/book/poker-books-online-free.html lacks originality, the characters are unrealistically extreme and generally just quite irritatingand what few interesting characters Martin did start out with are long gone by the fourth book, lost to unrealistic shifts in character or pointless and unengaging death scenes that are not in any way emotionally affecting.
Maybe it is just my personal taste, but really?
I am shocked at how much hype this has got.
I thought it was just an embarrassment to read, and I am giving my copy to charity as soon as I can.
Maja from Croatia I studied literature and know that some of the best books ever written did not develop stories, characters the rating game book endings the way the audience wants or deserves.
It's not a matter of a compromise.
However, these days, for the fact of globalisation we as readers want to think that the book, the author and the reader are one big factory.
I prefer waiting for each book sequence in suspense, even if it does not satisfy my expectations.
JRRM's Song of Ice and Fire in my opinion is simply amazing, and it's definitively not easy to read.
It's like an expanding storm that swirls the characters and plots in concentric circles.
Consumes time for sure, and if you think it's too long - you should read shorter books.
If you think it's overly descriptive - you're missing the beauty of visualisation of every spot and object and character, when you should be grateful to JRRM for letting you see what he is seeing.
It's not a one-read-book and will show you something new every time you reread.
Hans from Belgium I enjoyed reading it.
And i will finish it.
This is mainly because i believe the story has enormous potential to endand i quote the great academic J Clarksonon ' a bombshell'.
But i do have to critisize a bit.
The book is frustratingly long.
Jonathan from United States This is a great and wonderful read, from start to finish it keeps you guessing and gets you involved with each and every character, so much so that you find yourself falling in love with each one of them, even the not so nice ones, and if you see a bad rating it's simply because that person did not get it or understand the plot.
Anon from Sydney, Australia It's not that the author is trying to say that good people die, it's just that a lot of people really don't get what goes on.
It's the most cunning and luckiest that survive.
The characters do tend to change quickly from time to time, which would level my rating down a bit, and some of the characters I love to hate.
It is unpredictable and the last two books have been a droll, again lowering my rating.
Overall, it's a great fantasy book, and better in quality than a lot of other fantasy novels.
The lore is immersive and detailed, though some parts unecessary.
The book may have started out as Article source vs York as in War of the Roses, which is what the books are based on but now it's turned into a massive fight for dominance over land and power, with no one exactly safe and leaving a lot of hype.
Do hope Martin picks up in the next book and hurries it up a bit.
And I don't get why people say the good guys always lose.
The good guys occasionally triumph.
For the people saying that they want to argue why it's not good, wish there was a comment section.
Jon from UK Captain Frogbert, you a clearly a moron who is obsessed with LOTR.
I really don't even know where to start with how wrong you are on every point you made in your review of this book.
If you are really that upset with this book you should just go read LOTR another eleventy twelve times and leave the rest of us alone.
Anon from Anon OMG I have just finished the blooming lot of them and I have to exactly the same confusion, I am utterly exasperated that barely a plot line has been concluded.
The whole thing after the quite good Clash of Kings has become an utter nonsense, time I will never get back.
Sean from Australia It's ok.
He's not a particularly good writer, in terms of characterisation some of the pov writing of the younger characters is execrable and the book is pointlessly long.
I have severe difficulty in accepting that any reader who gave this book 10 stars has seriously thought at all about the possibility that a 15 year old could successfully lead a hardened army into battle without a viceroy pulling he tactical strings or that a 4 year old would be capable of being the master of a a wild wolf.
Ok it's fantasy, but that doesn't mean it has to be total b.
If it wasn't for Tyrion the book would stink quite badly.
Convolution is no substitute for good writing, by the way.
Good for fantasy writing but it ain't great.
Watch the series instead, still contains a teeth- gratingnumber of 'yes, my liege' type conversations, but again, Tyrion saves the day.
Guy from England I am outraged at the position of this series on the top 100 list.
This should be at least second the Malazan Book Of The Fallen is also AWSOME.
Out of the many, many books that I have read these are my favourite: the many interwoven storylines are well thoughtout and presented.
The books set a new level of fantasy, portraying a brutal, gritty and mature story with many hundreds of realistic characters.
There are no good vs evil here, no super powered imortal heroes.
Martin is a master writer, he leaves you laughing and weeping and it is extremly easy to loose yourselve in his world.
Once I got the first book purchased on a whim I was hooked and had read the whole series on the inside of a month.
The book was ok.
Einar from Norway I am sorry to say that I have read five volumes, while my frustration has been steadily increasing.
All the plots are still hanging in the air.
The time I spent reading these books feels like a waste of time, and I can absolutely not recommend them to anybody.
Matthew from US Boring.
It's not that I don't get it.
It's simply that nothing happens.
People try to say that if you don't like it you are not smart enough to understand all the intricacies and nuances, or whatever, but I think that the opposite is true.
I think that it is less intelligent people that are easily wrapped up in that stuff.
It's just like a soap opera.
There is no story.
There is no point.
I can't believe this ever got published, let alone made into a show.
PS I usually try to avoid saying this, but since a guy pointed out his genius level IQ in his good review, I want to point out that I also have a genius level IQ.
Karen from England The Review, Part 2.
To cut a long story short, this might have made a decent trilogy, but frankly, life's too short for stuff that goes on.
Karen from England Just started this a couple of days ago, Martin is a new writer to me and after reading the reviews I've got to say I've never seen a fantasy author divide opinion so much.
Five stars based on what I've read so far, although that might change in the course of time.
Tyrion Lannister - best character so far, no contest.
Andy from uk the most engrossing read i just couldnt put it down.
John from Canada I did not enjoy book one from the first sentence, although there is a soap opera quality about the lame writing style that keeps tricking you that some time down the road, something by the middle of the book ANYTHING would have been good will happen eventually.
By three quarters of the way through, I was still on the verge of putting it down, especially since after 600 or so pages I was still basically uninterested in a single character, and I've seen Bazooka Joe comics with more depth, but that soap opera drug laced in between the lines kept me going.
Until a war breaks out between the Lannisters and the Starks, and Martin describes the horns as having a haroooooooooooooo sound, and the Lannister trumpets as a Do-DA, Do-DAAAAAAAAAAAA.
I have never laughed so hard as I put a book down in my life.
We have an author who trumped his own horrible writing with a trumpet.
Nice attempt at onomatopoeia.
Uday from Canada I think most of the readers giving negative remarks just either can't take the complexity of the story or are the kind of people that have to have everybody live and have a corny happy ending.
I mean one of the great things that GRRM has done with this series is how he makes you really love the characters-yes even Cersei- and how he isn't afraid of actually killing off those characters.
That alone makes the story so much more interesting and suspenseful, because you never know when any character might die.
Also, as for those of you saying that you don't see the importance of characters like Jon, Dany and Sansa you just haven't read far enough into the series.
They're chapters become very interesting and you can really relate to them.
The first three books have to be the best.
The characters are rich, writing style superb, more of the fantasy and magic further on in the series and way the chapters are split really make you see things on a much larger scale and make you appreciate the effort of all that detail even more.
Another thing, it takes lots of superb writing and imagination to not just use the "magic" part of fantasy to solve all of the conflicts, and than you can appreciate characters like Tyrion who use their intellect a lot more.
If you liked the Wheel of Time I feel you will like the Song of Ice and Fire series just as much or more.
Doto from Ruskiland The first 2 books were good I thought.
The rest felt like author already ran out of anything new to say and were full of filler.
The characters started to turn from believable to completely poor.
The story stopped advancing.
Then the author started to introduce 999999999 different characters that I was starting to get lost in not to mention completely not care about while the characters I thought were interesting were dropped or have a few uninteresting chapters filled with adjective filler instead of witty dialogue or plot.
I recommend first 1-2 books the rest are just cash cow.
Jake from United States Personally, I find people who really criticize this series only look at things on the surface it's too long, too many characters, too graphic, poor characters, etc.
They don't look at things deeper, try and see why things are the way they are, and just think of this great series as a pointless kill fest.
In reality, a lot of the space is meant to build tension and expand on things, the characters are much deeper than click here give them credit for, and if you can't follow along then there is nothing I can do for you.
Also, why would anyone say Martin's writing is bad?
I think his prose is excellent and really develops emotion, atmosphere, and setting.
Brian from USA Do yourself a favor and read Lackey's collaborative series that starts with 'The Shadow of the Lion' about convoluted politics in byzantine fantasy Italy if you are interested in gritty, deeply-laid plots, rich character development, and epic scope in a fantasy world.
Don't get me wrong, I genuinely like Martin.
His collaboration with, and editing of, the Wildcard series probably changed the face and raised the bar of the entire superhero genre for all time, but this particular series evokes echoes of L.
Ron Hubbard more than it does Tolkien, Machiavelli, or Jordan.
Colby from USA Where to start?
A few years back my cousin made it his mission to get everyone in our circle of friends to read the series.
When news hit that HBO was going to make a show out of it and all my friends raving about the series I decided "why not" and gave the first book a try.
Didn't hate the book but was definitely let down.
Gave Martin the more info of the doubt that this book was just used as introduction and setup for the rest of the series, and that I was in for a ride.
Made it through the first 200 pages of the third book and.
I can't say this is a BAD book by any means.
I just find it very convoluted and overrated.
Martin seems so determined to ram quantity over quality down throat.
Too many characters, plot lines, and too many descriptions of each.
It reminds me of going to a restaurant that has everything on the menu, from sushi, steaks, chicken wings, spaghetti, chili, enchiladas, lobster, and pizza, and none of it turns out very good.
I'd rather have the eatery that focuses and bangs out a few key specialties every night.
I found it very hard to connect with the characters when I'd read about them for 1 chapter and then have them disappear for 80 pages at a time.
There were times where I'd already forget what said POV character was doing the last time I read about him because of the length of absence.
I've read the first 2.
Or Jon Snow for that matter.
Cut these two out and I don't see how the main plot changes.
Even when someone dies, 2-3 more characters are added which diminishes the whole point of the dying character's death.
I also thought fantasy books were supposed to contain fantasy?
It merely seems to be sprinkled in so far instead of embracing it.
What I'm seeing so far is two main parties Starks and Lannisters fighting over who runs the country, I could turn it to C-SPAN and hunger games prequel book that.
For something that is deemed as fantasy, it's incredibly down to earth.
I don't mind sex reads and gory violence if it's done right.
I mean, 50 Shades of Grey is quite popular right now with the former.
Martin's scenes though just seem to be spontaneous acts to show.
I don't know what.
As if everyone does it to pass the time.
It's the kind of reading I would have loved when I was a horny 14 year old kid but as an adult I don't see it adding anything.
Last criticism, the pacing of the story is way too slow for my taste.
Most of this is due to the excessive number of characters and sub plots.
Martin ends up weighing the series down rather moving it along.
I want the small sports car that zips down the highway, not the diesel that lumbers and slugs along.
All of this could have been avoided if Martin would simply realize that his story contains fat in need of trimming.
The greatest authors can tell a fantastic story in the least amount of words.
Since there are plenty of Lord of the Rings comparisons, here's another.
Counting the Hobbit, Tolkien was able to create Middle-Earth in roughly 1200-1300 pages.
Martin has already written about 4000 pages and is nowhere close to finishing his tale.
Leads me to believe he can't bring it all together.
But let me end on what Martin does get right.
He can deem up a few entertaining characters, whether good or evil.
Joffrey and Cersei might be despicable, loathsome characters but we'd be bored without them.
Then we have the devious cunning of Littlefinger and Tyrion.
Or the wise beyond her years, Arya.
Also, when something actually does happen for a change, Martin does a really good job keeping the reader entertained and eagerly turning the pages until I get to a Sansa or Dany chapter that is.
The climax and twists genuinely did keep me guessing as to what happens next.
Again, this is not a bad series but could have been so much more.
My advice, skip the books and watch the HBO series.
It keeps the relevant story bits and edits out the cumbersome pace of the books.
Forrest from Florida I will admit, the first three books had me enthralled.
However, when I started turning the pages of book four, I started skipping paragraphs, pages and finally chapters.
I understand if you want to tell a story from multiple perspectives, but I would rather not read from a characters perspective that I detest, it's annoying.
Pray do tell, what is the point of giving the ENTIRE history of an unlikable character ex: Cerseijust for them to remain hated, with no advancement of the story?
Also, when the entirety of every sixth paragraph focuses on what the character is eating, with excruciating detail, it becomes repetitive and boring.
That, and the overly descriptive nature of every character and castle make this story a screenplay, not a book.
Ed from California This complete series is a promise of things to come.
Every interesting character disappears in one way or another.
How repetitive can you get?
It seems like Martin's plot was to disappoint us with every character.
What aggravates me the most is that the story and characters had such potential when it began.
I suggest you read the first couple books and get out of Dodge, unless you prefer "Rocky Balboa gets killed in a car crash on his way to the fight"!
I have had this dream before.
Wes from Australia First off - this series isn't for everyone.
It introduces a lot of characters, so if you struggle with that you won't like it.
Second, no one is safe.
For this, I love the series.
But for many people who need to have their heroes survive - you will hate this.
Third, the writing is long - but beautifully written, and I think some people will miss a lot of the intricacies and don't quite get the writing style.
This series breaks a lot of convention, but if you can handle that and have the patience you will love it!
If you struggle with multiple characters, need a safe happy warm ending and like a more traditional style this series isn't for you, and frankly that is where a lot of these negative comments are coming from.
Also many of the negative reviews abandoned the series early on, and in my opinion the second volume of Storm of Swords is where it gets amazing.
One reviewer felt characters got killed off and the story arcs ended there - to that, I say they aren't getting the bigger picture, but I won't say specifics as not to reveal any spoilers.
Bear in mind it will be years before the next book, so if you don't want to wait that long and possibly many years after that for the final book then you might want to avoid the series.
Jon from England Overall, a very good series.
The last two not so good, but still a reasonable read I'm hoping that Martin will pick up his game again for the next books.
It's been levelled here that he's not the best writer in the world and that's probably fair, but then neither was Tolkien and he was an Oxford don and I'm unlikely to read Erikson or Jordan for their literary value either, if it comes to it.
He tells a good story and, whilst they're not as atypical as some reviews might like to suggest, he creates characters that you actually care about.
This is evidenced here by the number of peole moaning about how he's killed off their favourite characters - it wouldn't upset you if you didn't like them.
One thing that I particularly like about the series is the sparing use of magic.
It's always been an annoyance in fantasy that when faced with a difficult situation, the writer could quite literally wave a magic wand at it.
It also increases the impact on the reader when there actually is magic.
As a result, this isn't a series for fans of more overtly magical fantasy.
There aren't wizards, elves, goblins and orcs pouring out of the woodwork here.
I think that due to the size of the series, there are now a lot of plot strands for Martin to hold together.
This means that, firstly, it's tough to follow some times and secondly, it's tough for Martin to write.
As a result, it takes him a while to get each installment written, so you need patience and a good memory.
Finally, there's a lot of sex and violence.
Ivan from Canada Wow, these books are incredible.
Best books I've ever read.
Do not listen to the trolls calling it poorly written.
The number of different story lines and character incentives is incredible.
Probably too much for some read more to understand and they get lost with the amount of characters.
Do yourself a favour and get these books!!!!!
Brett from Canada Not sure if half the people are elitest or the other half are fanboys but I found the book very engrossing, funny and angering at times although I hate that he killed off my 3 favorite characters.
Emina from Melbourne, Australia I haven't read the book, and after reading most of the reviews I have no desire to.
I mean even, when the movie came out I didn't really find the plot that interesting, or should I say the idea.
Also, to the really super smart "genius" above, what does an IQ have to do with what you like??
Yours, was by far the stupidest comment ever!
Hazel from Canada Mediocre writing.
Killing with no apparent direction.
Despite my disappointment in these areas I read the first book long enough to be taken hostage by the characters only to be gravely disappointed I'd ever continued later on in the series.
Sad from United States Those reviews make me really sad.
Basically, people are just coming to GRRM books because they cannot read, and are watching HBO series.
Both the TV series and the books are really bad.
First, there is the constant repetition of words in sentences and sentences in paragraphs.
Is like a copy and paste work of a lazy writer.
Second, characters are really shallow.
None of them have any serious psychological crossroads and issues, they are just the same hack-and-slash brutes, or honorable-idiot-naive, in different nuances.
Third, the world building is basically pathetic.
How can a planet have winters of decades that don't even follow a regular pattern?
Also, deserts grow south, while the north the cold part, how creative.
So, that planet must have some very eccentric orbit.
There is no folklore, there is no culture, there are no strong religions, just a mix-up of our Earth religions and taken from the summaries on an Elementary school encyclopedia.
Fourth, he keeps repeating himself because he is a really bad writer that "writes as he goes", so he needs a lot of Deus Ex Machina events on order to solve the issues and questions that are carried out through the books.
And, nevertheless, he cannot make the story get a proper pace.
I, unfortunately, had to read the five books two times, one on a basis of 150 to 200 pages per day, and the second time, on a fixed basis of 50 pages per day, as I had to make a complete, encyclopedic, critical summary, with all the style mistakes, a deep analysis of plots and characters, and so on.
So, I can consider myself a specialist in this series, and that is why I can state: it is really one of the worse literary works in the history of Mankind.
Pete Bates from UK Maurice felt the need to state he has an IQ of 147, this makes him anything but a genius.
As for the book, it's over-indulgent.
The plot itself is overly complex, hindering rather than aiding the story as a whole.
They're too many narrative strands just leading to a slow moving behemoth with all its meaning being saturated in too many separate narratives.
He tries to incorporate too much of his stories fabula and world into the story creating a contrived, mess of narratives.
His world is rich and this could have been shown to greater effect in a far more controlled narrative.
Martin appears to be a man with many great ideas whilst lacking the control to properly put them into practice.
Maurice from Cayman Islands Anyone not loving this series must be seriously dull or retarded.
I have an IQ of 147, making me a genius and have read just about all the great fantasy series.
This series yields to none.
Alex from Italy The best book I ever read, just finished the third book and I can't get enough of it!
Andy from Ottawa, Canada More info I read these books and I did read 1-5 there was not one moment where I was not totally into it.
After book 1-3 there are no requirements for big battles scenes at least until the characters are deemed ready to do so.
Its fantasy, its action, its drama, its horror, its all I need all at once.
Michael from Sydney I have to agree with the more negative reviews: the first couple of books are not too bad, but its going downhill and it soon loses its way.
Characters seem to be killed off for no particular reason and entire plot-lines disappear with them and are not replaced by anything interesting.
The series is bloated and self-indulgent.
Its a shame because it seemed to have so much potential as I read the first book.
First lesson that Martin needs to learn: Less is More.
The great authors understand this and their books are still being read decades later: Tolkien's Lord of the Rings, Le Guin's Earthsea, Howard's Conan, Moorcock's Elric.
Martin doesn't get it and I don't have time to read to the end of an increasingly turgid five-part series to indulge him.
Alan from Canada The first 2 books are great, 3 is mildly entertaining but not great.
Stopped reading the 4th book midway through.
Too bad nobody thought Martin needed an editor.
Less is more, pal.
Gary from England Started reading this series of books after being amazed by the HBO Series.
I thought the first 2 books really drew you in to the stories and made you care for and hate the characters.
Unfortunately from book 3 onwards the story has lost it's edge and Martin seems to be telling the story for the sake of it rather than developing the characters we once cared for, he seems to think that killing of the people we root for is a way of keeping the reader interested, it ultimately has the reverse effect.
It reminds my of lots of US series such as Lost, Fringe and many more who have an excellent early series but then struggle to maintain the intensity.
I am currently reading A Dance with Dragons and even though I already have Winds of Winter waiting in the wings I may not even bother opening it if A dance with Dragons continues with it's plod through the seven kingdoms.
Cathy from Ohio No denying that George R.
Martin is a talented author and plot initiator.
Each release was a greater and greater disappointment.
He is nothing compared to Tolkien, where a true story was woven and hope against a crueler world was presented to a thirsty audience.
These books just present cruelty and avarice as mankind's inheritance - perfect for Hollywood.
Plato from Timbuktu Nice writing style, excellent plot, amazing world.
I love how Martin weaves together seemingly unconnected plotlines and shows us so many perspectives, giving us a much more sophisticated understanding of the story.
The world Martin created is awesomely huge and complicated, although the endless introductions of new characters can be hard to get into.
Also, the not-deaths get pretty annoying after a while.
Other than this, I have no criticism for the series, and am eagerly awaiting the release of the 6th book.
Ron from USA I love fantasy.
I read to escape the world and maybe learn a bit along the way.
But when I read this book I actually wanted to escape it, rather than use it as an escape.
The characters are dark, and the only decent ones are either subjected to horrible circumstances and changed to be dark, or killed.
There are a few interesting characters but they are shoved to the side to make way for the more "interesting and human" characters that go around killing and raping.
This book is slow, boring, and dark, and if that's what you want then good for you.
But if you want a book that's interesting, or just actually goes anywhere in less than 5 books, than you should probably look elsewhere.
Nat from India Well I had heard a lot about this book online and saw that it had got great reviews from everyone, moreover the HBO series of AGOT was also there so I finally decided to read this one.
The book is um something very unique and good in its own way.
It's gritty and mature more to the extent than I had anticipated, the plot is laid out brilliantly.
The storyline and characters are good though it seems that Martin according to me didn't satisfactorily end it.
The tortures through which the characters are put through and it seems that Martin's focus on keeping things like this makes me wonder that there won't be a great ending to this thing and things would cross to such an extent that it wouldn't matter at all.
One more thing is that it's surprising a bit that there is absolutely next to no magic though there are some fantasy elements but for most of the times it seems like maybe a non fantasy novel.
The book was with all things still great.
Full of twists and surprises.
Definitely a good read though maybe not for everyone.
Gary A from Australia Books 1 and 2 are great.
Book 3 is ok.
Books 4 and 5 are garbage.
The fact that books 4 and 5 are are garbage makes everythig in the first three books garbage as well.
The plots that were set up in the first two books all just melt away.
Characters that have been developed over many many pages are just terminated with all their associated plots just left hanging where there once could have been a good story.
This is a great concept but this guy is just trying to tell too much story and it looks to me that he was sick of writing it by book 4 and just wanted it done.
At the end of book 1 and book 2 you can't wait to read the next one.
Don't waste your time or your money.
David from USA Read through the 3rd book and going to stop.
While I enjoy the read, have the same complaints of over subplot development without any conclusions or wrap up.
There is no end, a good story should have beginning middle and end.
Other than killing off characters, no conclusions or endings.
After over 3000 pages no hope of an outcome.
Very disappointed because I was entranced by the first book.
After speaking to several friends who finished the series, they all told me to stop where I am.
Jani from Finland I can't really understand many of the reviews posted here.
The sex scenes I don't have a problem with.
It's not like they are great, but I don't get ticked off about them either.
The only complaint I agree with is the occasionally dull storyline Arya's chapters mostly but there are just more good chapters than bad.
But the thing I really don't get is the overwhelming complaining of G.
Martin killing the likeable characters.
I mean come on people!
I might be forgetting someone but not anyone special.
Remember, Catelyn DOES NOT die, Bran and Rickon don't die either, not Davos, not Tyrion, not Jaime, not Daenerys, not Brienne, not Arya and it also seems that the Hound is still alive, working with his sins as are gravedigger.
I am pretty sure that Jon doesn't die in book 5 either, just another Martin cliffhanger.
A lot of the unlikeable characters have died.
Joffrey, The Mountain, Balon Greyjoy and Theon is a spacecase.
I myself found the books great, but a rating of 9 is accurate because George is occasionly stretching the storyline through cliffhangers and dull chapters.
Frank from Cork The best fantasy series of all time in my opinion.
It's a complex plot that makes you work and even re-read the books to pick up the clues, but if you do then you will be rewarded.
It's not for everyone and if you want instant gratification, black and white good guys and bad guys, clean-cut dragon-slaying heroes, evil wizards, etc.
If you're the type of idiot who skips whole chapters and still expects to get something from the book, then ASoIaF is most certainly not for you.
GRRM is a genius and this series is a brilliantly woven masterpiece.
That said, I'm not surprised by some of the negative comments, there will always be people who prefer the likes of 50Cent to Beethoven.
Matt Cole from Vancouver BC If writers are Gods — and they are — then George R.
Martin is Zeus, King of Gods.
Martin flawlessly weaves a tale of epic fantasy to launch, which is arguably the best fantasy series ever I know The Lord of The Rings and The Malazan Empire have their fans.
Tyrion, Sandor Clegane the HoundCersei, Arya, and Daenerys are particularly memorable.
This first installment is not heavily loaded with magic and the supernatural.
Other than the appearance of a supernatural race in the opening pages and again briefly later on, and the emergence of other mythological creatures in the closing pages, Game of Thrones is devoid of magic and the supernatural.
The conflict is among men and women, noble houses positioning themselves for the throne of a Kingdom.
The book is laden with political intrigue, conspiracy, ambition, and hidden family secrets.
Still, while the great houses maneuver for control of the throne, the reader is ever aware of a long dormant evil, that may rise to threaten the populace of the seven kingdoms.
As per the suggestion from other reviewers that this book is too explicit, I can say I have no idea where this is coming from.
I would not consider either the sex or violence in this book too explicit.
Certainly Steven Erikson and R.
Scott Bakker have gone farther in their series.
Roland from South Africa Man oh man, where do I start?
I was looking for another fantasy epic after reading Lord of the Rings and found the first book and I bought it, probably read the first 30 to 40 pages and I was so dissapointed!
I just stopped there.
Come on don't we have enough misery in the REAL world!
And really like some of the reviews said: a 48-year-old man writing about explicit deeds done to 13-year-old girls?
That is quite creepy and out of character for real fantasy.
If any prospective readers are reading this, please stop and don't make the same mistake I did: NOT READING THE READER REVIEWS!
It makes all the difference.
To sum it up: What a sad Song of Fire and Ice.
Barb from Wisconsin I took the time to read all 5 books in the series and when I got to the end of book number 5, I felt like it had been a big waste of time.
Within each book, Martin introduced countless characters, meandered off into numerous storylines and spent endless pages on descriptions and conversations that were of no story value.
By the end of book number 5 not one storyline came to a conclusion and I was left wondering what had happened to or would happen with all the characters that had been introduced.
Additionally, I felt like I had suffered through so much death, destruction, perversity and nasty sex scenes that not having anything conclude was especially disappointing.
Martin clearly got himself into a typing frenzy and forgot about how to really develop and tell a story.
If you choose to read all 5 books, prepare yourself for disappointment.
The Eragon series by Paolini who started writing his series in his early teens was better written than Game of Thrones and there is certainly no positive comparison to be made of Game of Thrones to J.
Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.
John from Ljubljana I have read the first three books and they are all fantastic to read; they involve everything a great fantasy book needs.
The series has an absurd amount of astonishingly realistic characters who couldn't be https://filmman.ru/book/australian-slot-machines-free-book-of-ra.html different and yet at the same time they are all still the characters inhabiting this amazing fantasy world.
I fell in love with the Game of Thrones almost immediately, mainly because of unexpected turns and twists, that are not so common in this genre.
I highly recommend it to all fantasy fans out there.
Cat Fitzpatrick from London, UK I think a main reason why there is such a difference in opinion regarding this series is that the fantasy element is very small compared to the huge volume of story.
The main strength of A Song of Ice and Fire lies in the politics of a kingdom embroiled in a civil war where there isn't just two armies battling for the throne, there are up to seven various forces struggling to lay claim to either part or the whole of Westeros.
There are very good characters that come through - Tyrion Lannister for one is really interesting, and I really like the deviousness of Petyr Baelish - but as you go through the books the volume of characters increases, which can swamp the story in parts, and characters can vanish for quite a long time whilst the others are worked through.
The story can be quite slow and repetitive, and not enough time is spent to really build all of the main characters as well as they could be.
Sex is also overused with everybody at it like rabbits or raping their way up and down the length of Westeros.
However, some great set pieces are developed such as the use of wildfire in a river battle, and if you like epic stories this is richly detailed if maybe too over ambitious as to the amount of stuff crammed in.
It's worth a read, but takes a lot of investment of time to get to the good bits.
Jeffrey from Missouri First one is pretty good, but as others say, it goes downhill from there.
I am near the end of 3rd one, and what I keep thinking of is that this is just like the daytime soaps on TV.
It has turned into an endless series of twists and turns, where you can predict that just when one of the "good guys" just about get to a good place, some unlikely twist will prevent them from getting there.
The villians, when they lose, get banished, etc.
The sympathetic characters are all telegraphed simply by the names of the chapters.
The twists seem to be just for the sake of throwing in a twist to keep the story going, not to advance the plot towards a conclusion.
I will probably finish the series, because I have invested enough in knowing what happens, but as I read it I have this gut feeling like I am wasting my time.
Regarding the prose and characters.
I hear people praising the prose.
When I first started the book, I could not help but think of "A Conneticut Yankee at King Arthur's Court" by Mark Twain.
He does a wonderful send-up of the whole "knights in shining armor" style in that wonderful parody.
I give it a 4 because despite the many weaknesses I see, I AM still reading it, so something must be done right.
Tyler from US One of the most drawn out stories with so little action and magic I've read.
Isn't the story I had hoped to read.
Sid This is easily the most overrated series in history.
It's not abysmal, mind you, but it's not great either.
The first couple of books are actually page-turners as Martin's style makes for very quick and fairly entertaining reads.
The attention is kept high through the use of plot-devices like cliffhangers, random character killing and equally random adult scenes.
Later on it develops into something more magic-oriented with undead and dragons.
Overall the plot is not that bad but it's terribly slow-paced and NOT original, especially in later books.
Some are well built at least in the initial "cast" but if the author really thinks his characters are realistic and "grey" he is deluding himself.
Most of them are flat and play the same stereotyped part throughout the entire series the first 5 books at least.
There are occasional side-changes but they're quite predictable and far from being mind-blowing.
Lots of important characters die in these books.
Because if you want to kill your characters you have to REPLACE them somehow.
GRRM apparently exausted his creativity in giving birth to the first "batch" of characters and every subsequent entry is even MORE dull, flat and utterly uninteresting.
Random, useless sex scenes every 50 pages or so?
At first it's somewhat entertaining but after 3 books you'll just say "Owww, again??!?!?!??
The level of detail can be painful at times.
Allow me to say it once more: the adult scenes in this series are useless, gratuitous and boring.
This is little more than a moneymaking franchise, decent at first but getting worse and worse with every installment.
There are A LOT of fantasy series much, much better than this.
David from Netherlands I've read a lot of Fantasy.
I guess this book was never meant purely for the Fantasy fans.
This book transvers from the individual FFans to the general public.
That in itself is a great achievemend.
I've read the books.
The massiveness about this story is good.
The multiple threads, the mulitple main characters.
It gives it a lot of credibility.
It is actually the strongest point of this project.
There's almost no speed to the pace of this story.
It goes on and on without much spectacular happening.
There are no really great crushing scenes that stay in my mind, where I can almost quote the whole LOTR trilogy by memory alone.
I must convess even though I've read the whole series twice to get in back in order after the long period of waiting for the next book I still cant remember a lot of it.
If you want a real great, slightly faster paced story with at least things happening and some things able to linger I would advice Robert Jordan.
Andreas from Sweden Have to say that this must be one of the most overestimated books ever.
He can write a whole chapter without shit happening.
I have read to the middle of book 4 and I have to say, he kills of every single character that's interesting.
Or he stops telling the story about them.
First book starts of good.
But from when Ed dies its just downhill.
I don't get ppl that says that amazing is and to low.
You need to read more books, some good books.
I don't want to finish the books but I feel that I have to, too much invested now.
Thank god that I didnt pay for it.
I would like to talk to George Martin and ask him just how the fuck he thought when he wrote this.
On the plus side, I enjoyed the story-telling.
But got bored of the endless descriptions of armour by the end.
This is written to be a best seller - nice and easy to read, without much depth.
It lacks literary merit, the language is poor and the descriptions not particularly evocative.
The real silliness seems to be his lack of imagination: The map of Westeros is an enlarged Britain, with the capital roughly where London is, and a big wall for Hadrian's wall.
North of the wall are savages poor Scots and there are vestiges of the indigenous Celtic religion in the wild woods.
The 'civilized' have the conqueror's Christian religion of course but it doesn't seem as exciting - surprise, surprise.
Barbarian hordes with their own savage ways threaten from across the continent, and the main action consists of conflict between the House of Stark York and Lannister Lancaster.
I did like the idea of a really long Summer and Winter though, presumably this comes into more play in about 10,000 pages time.
Some people seem to think the book's greatness lies in its 'grittiness' or its muddying of good and evil.
Yet, throughout the book there is really no doubt which side is good and which is evil.
And although he supposedly told the story from different perspectives, there was little change of voice - a missed opportunity.
So, I guess, yes, it's like Tolkien,but without his depth, language or imagination.
Will from USA I read this book and its sequel, but could go no further.
I feel like Martin's method of telling the story from each character's perspective was interesting, but ultimately seemed to compel him to write ridiculously long chapters about characters that are of very little interest.
The amount of explicit content thrown into the novel is absolutely excessive, weighing down the novel with a layer of filth that in no way progress the story.
As other reviewers have mentioned, I have no problem with this content being included, but it quickly losses the little shock value it had, and does nothing to progress the novel.
The different elements contained in the book are split by region.
In the south, politics, wars, and other such evils of man occur.
The "evil" generally wins out and personally, I grew quite tired by the lack of anything good.
In the north there is an ominous wall, which is supposed to hold out all the real bad guys.
Martin generated a large interest in me for this region, despite it being a bland place of over done evils: zombies, shape shifters.
This region is where the magic seems to lay, but a minimal amount is seen.
There is also the region where the dragon queen lives.
I do not know her name.
I do not know what she has been doing.
All I know is that after two books and what felt like an endless amount of chapters dedicated to her, and she has managed to acquire three boats.
Ultimately, this separation serves to make the reader more inclined to read only certain character's chapters.
Regions are made to seem so distant as they have had minimal if any interaction makes it seem like it would be better to split the books by region.
The characters you don't connect with you will not read.
And you probably will not connect many characters, and the ones you do connect with just die.
These sudden deaths get approval from others claiming how shocking and "gutsy" it was to do such a thing.
The reality is that the author kills them off in such a manner that the reader is left wondering.
Why did the Character die?
A rarely answered question Do I care that this character died?
Most characters the rating game book upon death are some distant cousin to some character you read about through someone else's perspective 125 pages earlier.
Did the character really just die?
Turns out, the author lies to you, saying certain characters have died, and bringing them back to life later.
Killing characters off was something I once did in high school writing assignments to be done with said character.
I got a similar impression that this was Martin's use as well.
Characters themselves get varied levels of treatment to development.
Most of them did not make it past infancy, or after two books are still stuck in that.
I will not be reading thousands of pages to figure out what could have been put into two books.
There is no real conclusion after this book and the sequel.
I no longer care about the conclusion.
I did not know the HBO series existed upon reading this, and still have not watched it.
If you thought Eragon was a poor fantasy novel, then you're end for a prompt demand to re-appraise your rating of it.
The frustration I went through reading A Game of Thrones were tremendous.
Normally, I enjoy fantasy good and bad a great deal.
The worlds may have been strange in some cases, but imaginative.
A Game of Thrones fell short of every positive thing I had heard said about it.
Except I suppose the cover art was pretty good.
Andrew from Canada I haven't read the book, just commenting on the COMMENTS.
People who don't like it: they find it too explicit and lacking in coherent story telling plot lines.
People who like it: love the explicit content and just want others to like it too, without much else reason.
Based on that I don't think I'll get it.
James from Philadelphia This is one of my favorite series of all time.
Being able to understand so many different characters' perspectives on the books' events makes the series an extremely interesting read.
Books 1-3 are absolutely brilliant.
source am eagerly awaiting the final two installments and I hope they can live up to the promise that the series has shown up till now.
Big from Daz As with many of the above I came to these books via the HBO series which I thought was excellent, I am now on book 5 and starting to feel like the whole thing is being padded out to make someone extra 'coin '.
Most of the story and main characters either died or came to an end by book 4, as someone above said I really get the feeling Martin is bored himself, or planned to bring it all to an end around this point.
The bit with Ayra going backwards and forwards in the book was made so much better in the mini series they cut it out!
The sex scenes are too much, Martin has a worrying sexual fantassy with Dany a very young girl in the book, touching herself, exploring her sexuality, was it neccesary?
I was surprised at the age of many of his characters in the books, presumed they would grow over the course but then he kills them?
The mini series cuts out a lot of the fantasy stuff, seems to be staying away from the warg thing, green dreams, giants etc certainly not spending the time on it that Martin does and it's so much better for it.
Here's hoping the tv series keeps this to a minimum and maybe doesn't kill off Rob!
When it comes to rating I am marking down on the basis that one book I've just read part one of two started and ended having gone absolutley nowhere.
I get the feeling he wanted to end the whole thing around book 4, still going to stick it out to the end but don't expect to be able to make any character attachments.
Rupert from England Have just finished book 5 - is there a book 6?
Lots of stories left unanswered.
What happens to Bran, or Arya, the Wall, the Free People, Denares, the dragons, Stannis?
Richard from Washington, DC Martin seems to think that incessant scenes of rape, murder and incest equal "adult".
He fails to realize that this is just pandering to the lowest common denominator.
We get it, it's a hard old world!
Somewhere in all the thousands of pages, where he tells you what everyone is wearing and what every knight's heraldry looks like, there may be a good story.
But after three books I couldn't find it and have given up.
His prose is plodding, and using characters' full names all the time is annoying at best, as it feels like filler and ruins any rythym he might have had.
Almost all the characters are unlikeable and he seems to think killing any character that might be worth rooting for makes him "edgy".
Sorry, it just makes him lazy.
You just get the feeling he doesn't know where to go with these characters, and so he kills them off.
Besides, keeping them around might mean he would have to resolve storylines instead of keeping the money machine going with new characters and even more pointless storylines that he can end two books down the line when he runs out of idead for them.
And enough with the incest!
I wonder about him, if he can't think of any way of showing sexual relationships besides rape and incest.
He's not writing an epic fantasy series.
He's wrinting a porn soap opera.
Tonya from Paterson The reason most of us read is to escape the sometimes harsh reality of life.
In Games of Thrones I couldn't put the first book down, however I soon realized that evil was prevailing far too often.
There isn't enough relief for the good guys.
As an audience you need comedy, love and laughter just as much as tragedy and pain - there is an inbalance to these stories and killing off damn near ever underdog was just plain wrong.
I was totally disappointed.
Pat from Boston, MA It starts out apologise, listen to lord of the rings audio books online free congratulate a family that you immediately like and generally root for, some more then others but overall good start.
I thought some pages or hundreds could be edited out but because the story was so strong and the characters so good I wasn't upset reading page after page.
I was wishing I could read faster most times but by book 3-4 the story goes stale for me.
I thought killing off the "good guy" and leader of the story was awesome.
In a way I hate this book, it sucks, but then seeing the great changes smaller characters make to combat his death make you fall in love with Robb Stark, Arya, Jon Snow and even Jamie Lannister.
But after the "Red Wedding" the book to me became stupid, "bad guys" get 2nd 3rd and 4th chances while people you care about are killed off without hesitation or meaning.
Theon, Jamie, Cersie, Varys, Baelish and even the Vlegane brothers are never killed off like Ned or Rob and now maybe Jon.
I feel like Martin backed himself into a corner as people and agree with the statement that he's grown bored with this story.
Well, why do you think that?
Please get the story back on track and have a Stark win.
My rating now is a 5, after book 2 it was a 9 or 10.
Erik from Ohio The first three books are great.
They held my attention throughout with lots of different things happening in the same time period due to the variety of characters.
I like the setup of writing chapters about certain characters, and it's even more exciting when one character's fate brings them alongside another main character in the same chapter.
I wish GRRM would have kept the Starks intact with their direwolves completing the immensely strong family, but it's not all happy endings in life either.
Dave from Maryland Got through part of the fourth book and quit.
Seriously, WTF is up with killing off or drastically screwing up see more life of every character you get attached to?
I thought killing off Ned was cutting edge and suprising.
Evil seems to always win, and that just gets old.
A good thing once in a while would have kept me hopeful.
If I want to see reality of human behavior, I can watch the news; the hope with a book is to escape to a better place.
This series becomes a hell instead.
Captain Frogbert from New York I read the first book of this series and was thoroughly pleased to see the back of it.
Martin is, at best, a mediocre writer; a comparison to Michael Crichton would not be inappropriate: Plodding, trite, calculated, repetitive.
Add to that his clumsy attempts to invent language by misspelling common words and you have the worst sort of middlebrow hackery.
Oh, yes, calling a knight 'Ser' instead of Sir, really makes me feel like I'm in another world.
And Maester does the same thing.
One of his common "creative" threads is to make things BIGGER.
His "Eyrie" isn't just a tall tower like Barad Dur or Orthanc, it's a really, really, really tall tower like Barad Dur or Orthanc only TALLER — see how subtly better it is?
As for the world he has "created," well, his Dothraki are just yet another take on the Mongols can you say Horseclans or the Dalrei of Guy Gavriel Kay's Fionavar Tapestry?
The rest of the world is even worse, a pale pastiche of dark ages Europe via a worn carbon copy of J.
Off the top of my head, I can name you a dozen or more fantasy worlds with more depth and variety.
As for his characters, what a stifling band of dull, predictable, stick figures poorly disguised as plot devices or was it the other way around?
He tromps through his life growling and bemoaning his fate, never suspecting that the people EVERYONE ELSE KNOWS are the bad guys are going to do him in by lying, a concept he apparently cannot bring himself to understand, much less guard against.
Then he gets tossed in prison and, eleventy-twelve pages of other stuff happening later, comes out and recants his entire life and is killed.
Applause, applause all around.
Ooooh, what daring, killing off the main character like that.
Of course we never see his captivity or torture.
We never learn WHY he recants and loses his honor, we are simply left to presume that he was broken.
His death has no meaning because its entire reason for happening is so casually tossed away.
Oh well, off to the next whore house for him!
The rest of the characters are just as bad, little more than scrapings from the bottom of the central casting barrel.
The fat King Henry VIII via Falstaffthe evil queen how original!
This novel is soooo bad!
Game of Thrones is a lousy story, set in a boring world, written by a man who has no understanding of plot, pacing, story or character arc, or anything else a good writer understand.
And who is, apparently, utterly lacking in the basic ability to edit his work or simply to please!
Avoid this novel if you possibly can.
Modesto from New York This is a great adult fantasy series.
This story is not for everyone.
Especially for people who like sexy elves and tough dwarfs.
Not for those who seek instant gratification.
This is fantasy, a whole new fantasy, an adult fantasy.
I love how people are mad that certain characters are killed off but yet they bash the book, if you were not hooked and attached to the character you wouldn't care someone got knocked off.
This story is fantasy, thriller, exotic and poetic, you can argue it's real, if Westeros existed and Dothraki.
That is how people would have lived, killed and ventured.
It would be A Song of Ice and Fire!
Nancy from Honolulu First two books were gripping.
I am halfway into the third book and am finding it hard going, and I am a forgiving reader.
Far too many subplots going on with too many unsympathetic characters without a central unifying concept.
I will slog through, but I am finding myself taking digressions to read entirely different books, just to get a break.
This is a big change, as I read through the first two books over a long weekend - completely enthralled.
Kyle from Vancouver It's funny reading through all the reviews, the majority of tens come from people who've read only book 1, or book 1 and 2.
Those were great books, great character development.
But as many people here point out, as the series goes on, GRRM's reticence to conclude a single damn subplot much less a plotline, while opting instead to introduce endless new characters dilutes the overall narative as he is no longer able to do any one storyline or character justice.
The new characters don't get much development at all.
It's a shaggy dog story.
I'd give 8 or 9 stars to the first 2 books - but the series over all I'd say 4.
He's totally wandered off and does not seem likely to return, so I shall do the same.
Now, I'm going to go see what this Steve Erikson everyone mentions is all about.
George from Toronto This story is the best ever written in any genre, period.
The first book is a wonder, the second is as good, and the third is best in the series.
I agree, the fourth and fifth aren't my favourites.
But they're still above-average.
I can't wait to see how the story concludes -- Martin is planning a total of 7 books.
I read some of the negative reviews.
The ones who are negative put right in their review that they skipped chapters.
Martin is a genius story teller, he didn't write 1,000 pages for his health.
It was for a purpose.
If you skip a chapter, how on earth can you complain if the rest of the story stops making sense?
The man is a God.
I read Erikson, Tolkien, Rothfuss, Hemmingway, have game thrones book 3 apologise also crap like the Hunger Games.
Martin's story is 1 by a significant margin.
Hanna from USA I am not a book "reviewer" however, I was drawn into this series after I saw the HBO mini series "A Game of Thrones".
I read through the first 3 books anticipating what all the ground work Martin has laid to mean.
I can't finish it!
Nothing has come from the ground work that was laid in the first 3 books.
Main charaters are killed off for no apparent reason.
I feel like I am reading in circles and nothing is being resolved and nothing meant anything in the first 3 books.